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My experience with Brooklyn Bedding

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11 Jun 2013 18:05 #1 by firtree
I wasn't sure where to post this, so Phoenix, feel free to move it if necessary.

Just thought I'd put in my two cents. I wanted a latex bed for the longest time. I'd decided to kind of "build my own" because latex mattresses are so heavy and I thought if I layered toppers I'd get to the same result. I started with someone local and bought a 31 ILD on their suggestion. I then found this site and eventually Brooklyn Bedding. At this point, I wondered if I should continue with "building my mattress" or just start over with a mattress from them. I talked to Chuck and he suggested since I have a 31, to get both a 36 & 28 because that would give me a good bed. I placed the order and looked forward to getting it. In the following days I had the opportunity to lay on a friend's bed who had a 24 on top. That felt pretty good. I wondered if I should change it so called to talk with Chuck and he wasn't available so got Mario.

Mario's energy is quite different from Chuck (more like a car salesman) and he told me I should be looking at gel memory foam beds, since regular memory foam is too hot for me. I was pretty confused by the end of the conversation so asked him to cancel the order so I can think things through.

I did go to the big box mattress stores (on Mario's suggestion) and laid on the gel memory foam beds. I decided I preferred the bit of springiness latex offers more than the feeling of the memory foam. I called to reorder and got Jacob. He thought I should have a 24 instead of a 28... and I was willing to try it.

When I got my toppers, they'd sent a 28 instead. The order clearly said 24, but someone crossed that out and hand wrote 28, plus the writing on the plastic wrap said 28. I called and told Jacob and he said that can't be, he's sure they sent a 24. Well, many phone calls later and supposed checking on their end and they agreed they sent me the 28, not the 24.

They were willing to swap it out, but we decided to wait and see how it was before swapping, in case it worked fine. He told me returning was easy -- they'd send me a big box (because the toppers are super compressed to fit in the small boxes they come in), and a return label. Oh, also during this time, Mario got into the picture again and told me I should just talk to Chuck again since he set the order up in the first place. I said I'd like to, but he's not been available. Mario said he was going to talk with him and have him call me within the half hour. I've never heard from Chuck.

It's been about a week now and my hips are still sinking lower than the rest of me (I'm 120lbs) plus I'm sleeping way too hot. I wake up several times in the night just hot. I was surprised because I'd read and have been told that latex doesn't sleep hot. I did an internet search and actually did find others who also slept too hot on latex. It's the only thing different about my sleep set up, so I tend to think that's what's causing it.

I called Jacob today to explain all this and find out about returning them. They have a 120 day return policy. After refreshing his memory regarding who I am and which order I had, I expressed the problems of sinking in too far and sleeping too hot. He started in with how it isn't possible for me to sleep hot on latex. Their latex is the coolest and doesn't sleep hot and it must be something else causing it. He asked about my setup, what sheets do I have etc.

My setup hasn't changed for years. I use 100% cotton sheets over my 7 year old organic wool topper (Snuggle Mate from Shepherd's Dream), and a down comforter I've had for an enormous amount of years. I've never, ever slept hot. I actually feel heat under me.

I tried just laying on the latex, not my wool topper, and within an hour felt heat plus it just wasn't as soft as with my topper.

Jacob told me I should stop using my wool topper and that must be the problem. Then told me it's my comforter and I should get rid of that. And he even said "You know that 28 ILD is softer than 24, right?" Uh, no it isn't.

Ok. Everyone has off days yet I've felt that these guys don't really know that much about anything. Maybe Chuck is the brains and it's too bad he can't clone himself... :-)

So the returning part. Now, since I don't want to "exchange" the toppers -- just return them, I'm on my own. I have to get my own boxes that will fit them and of course pay return shipping. I do feel they should pay for the 28 since it was their mistake sending it, but it's all so confusing when talking to them I'm thinking I'll try selling them on Craigslist first. I'd even talked to both Mario & Jacob when the boxes first came and I saw the mistake on the packing slip. I wanted to return it before opening it. They told me to just open it because returning it was so easy... whatever.

I'm disappointed latex doesn't seem to work for me. I love the feeling of it and I really like my latex pillow. I don't feel hot with that at all. Is that odd? And I'm bummed that this setup doesn't seem to give me the support I need in my hips. If I wasn't sleeping hot, I'd try different firmness levels to get the support and softness I need for pressure points.

What's next for me I just don't know. Maybe a spring/coil mattress with another wool topper. Any thoughts on how to cool off the latex? Is that even possible?

I envy everyone who's having a dreamy time on their latex. You're all very fortunate!!! :-)

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11 Jun 2013 22:41 - 12 Jun 2013 01:55 #2 by Phoenix
Hi firtree,

Wow ... your experience with Dreamfoam certainly isn't the norm and it's confusing to me just trying to follow it and sort it out.

In my experience there is always another side to every story so I'll refrain from "taking sides" because your experience is certainly at odds with my own and hundreds of other people but it sounds to me like a classic case of too many conflicting opinions (or a "too many cooks spoil the broth" situation). This is quite common when you talk to different manufacturers or different people working at the same manufacturer or retailer who will often have their own thoughts and ideas which are sometimes contradictory. All of them may be well informed and given as their "best judgement" for your circumstances or based on the information exchanged in a particular phone call that may be different from another phone call even though they may be very different. Unfortunately there is no specific formula that can be applied to any issue when it comes to "mattress theory" and there is usually a range of possibilities for every issue. Each person may be at a different place inside the same range and no matter how accurate someone's ideas may be in the majority of cases ... there will always be exceptions for people who are outside of the range of experience that would apply to most people.

Some specific comments though ...

I said I'd like to, but he's not been available. Mario said he was going to talk with him and have him call me within the half hour. I've never heard from Chuck.


Did you try calling back? It sounds to me like the message may not have reached Chuck because he is usually good at calling back. It may be worth calling the Dreamfoam number because I think that's the number he normally deals with.

It's been about a week now and my hips are still sinking lower than the rest of me (I'm 120lbs)


This is normal because hips are heavier than the other parts of your body and tend to sink in further. It's also quite common that a different sleeping system has a "feeling" that you are sinking in differently though and this is part of why there is an adjustment period to any new sleeping surface. Having said that ... it's also a matter of degree and while it may be normal for your hips to sink in more deeply (and this depends to some degree on body type, sleeping position, and the firmness/softness of the latex) if there are "symptoms" connected to the "feeling" that your hips are sinking in too deeply then it may indicate an alignment issue. With your lighter weight it could also be that your shoulders or upper body aren't sinking in enough with a medium firmness latex which can "feel like" your hips are sinking in too deeply.

plus I'm sleeping way too hot. I wake up several times in the night just hot. I was surprised because I'd read and have been told that latex doesn't sleep hot. I did an internet search and actually did find others who also slept too hot on latex. It's the only thing different about my sleep set up, so I tend to think that's what's causing it.


As a category ... latex is the coolest of all the foam materials so the odds are much lower that anyone will sleep hot with latex compared to other types of foam but of course there are always exceptions. Many "reports" of people sleeping hot with latex may also have other issues that are connected with them (or their mattress may not even be latex in the comfort layers which is very common with major brands that are advertises as being latex). All foam is also an insulating material so there is always some potential that in combination with other factors it can sleep warmer than more breathable materials such as natural fibers. There are also many other reasons that someone can sleep hot that have to do with other layers or components in the sleeping system (such as the type of mattress protector you are using, toppers, and bedding). Post #2 here and post #29 here talk more about sleeping temperature and may help you identify the reasons you are sleeping hot.

Sometimes the reason that someone has a specific issue that is outside the norm for the majority of people just can't be discovered or identified ... as frustrating as that may be.

My setup hasn't changed for years. I use 100% cotton sheets over my 7 year old organic wool topper (Snuggle Mate from Shepherd's Dream), and a down comforter I've had for an enormous amount of years. I've never, ever slept hot. I actually feel heat under me.

I tried just laying on the latex, not my wool topper, and within an hour felt heat plus it just wasn't as soft as with my topper.


Any foam ... including latex ... will tend to sleep warmer than a wool topper (wool is much more temperature regulating and breathable than any foam including latex). I would use the wool topper on top of the latex. Most cotton sheets will also be fine in terms of temperature regulation. An innerspring mattress with natural fibers in the comfort layers is the "coolest" of the different types of mattresses and will sleep cooler for most people than any foam including latex.

Jacob told me I should stop using my wool topper and that must be the problem. Then told me it's my comforter and I should get rid of that. And he even said "You know that 28 ILD is softer than 24, right?" Uh, no it isn't.


Jacob deals with comfort choices every day so I'm sure there was some misunderstanding here because he is certainly aware that 24 ILD is softer than 28 ILD. It also could be your comforter but I doubt he was telling you to "get rid of it". This isn't their style and sounds to me like you may have misunderstood this as well. It seems that somehow the two of you weren't communicating very well for some reason but the suggestion to try things without the comforter for a bit is a reasonable suggestion to see if makes a difference. Sometimes certain combinations can trap heat that one or the other of the layers in different combinations won't.

What's next for me I just don't know. Maybe a spring/coil mattress with another wool topper. Any thoughts on how to cool off the latex? Is that even possible?


For most people a wool or silk or other natural fiber topper will provide more than enough temperature regulation for those that sleep too hot directly on the latex.

I do feel they should pay for the 28 since it was their mistake sending it, but it's all so confusing when talking to them I'm thinking I'll try selling them on Craigslist first.


If they sent you the wrong layer then it would certainly be reasonable for them to correct their mistake and replace it with the 24 ILD that you ordered ... not pay for the wrong layer outright IMO. Then you could try what you originally ordered and if this didn't work you could return it through their return policy. The "goal" of correcting a mistake is to put things back to the way they should have been in the first place.

Phoenix

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Last edit: 12 Jun 2013 01:55 by Phoenix.

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12 Jun 2013 08:33 #3 by tcat007
Just a quick comment on "softness". The softness system at Brooklyn is a little backwards, firm to soft going 1 to 10, whereas ILD goes firm to soft 44 to 14 (opposite direction), which they show in their "Learn" section. I can see how either the OP or a guy at BB could have easily mixed something up in the conversation. Although if a specific number was ordered, that number should have been delivered (or replaced at no cost).

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12 Jun 2013 11:15 #4 by firtree
HI Phoenix,

I realize my experience is different than the norm, and is why I posted it. I think the "too many cooks" reference you mentioned is correct.

Yes, I tried to reconnect with Chuck a few times and continued to get Mario or Jacob. I can certainly try again and see what he may suggest. I'm sure my post was a bit confusing to follow -- it's been a bit confusing to live it...

Regarding sinking in, my hips more so --- yes, it feels like an alignment issue and that's what I was trying to get across. It feels like I'm "slanting down". I don't feel my body is in alignment, plus my pressure points aren't getting relief. However, I'm nervous about a softer layer now, as I've read the softer layers sleep hotter. :unsure:

I may just be one of those folks who are more sensitive than others to latex and foam. I recall sleeping on a friend's memory foam mattress a few years ago and I woke up sometime in the night and literally jumped out of bed because my skin actually felt like it was burning. Family members have memory foam mattresses and experience nothing negative -- they love it. My body just does better with natural materials. I only wear natural fibers too. No polyester in my closet, nothing that doesn't breathe.

Regarding layering & what might be there, it's all natural. I didn't want an Ultimate Dreams bed because it had synthetic foam. I wanted to go all latex for the breathability and naturalness. I have all latex layers, "Puralux" at the base (from a local merchant before I discovered this forum), and the other two being Talalay from BB. Then there's my wool topper and cotton sheets. It is possible my comforter is trapping the heat and I will try sleeping without it, however I'm not keen on the idea of having a mattress system that wouldn't allow me to use it. Ideally I'd like to find something that just suits my body / lifestyle / is right for me. I've used my comforter year round -- except on those rare 90 degree nights -- and haven't had any issues with overheating until now.

All in all, I will try to connect with Chuck again and hopefully sort it all out.

Thank you for all your comments / thoughts. We all appreciate this site and YOU. Thanks for all your efforts. :)

firtree

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12 Jun 2013 14:10 - 12 Jun 2013 14:12 #5 by Phoenix
Hi firtree,

Regarding sinking in, my hips more so --- yes, it feels like an alignment issue and that's what I was trying to get across. It feels like I'm "slanting down". I don't feel my body is in alignment, plus my pressure points aren't getting relief. However, I'm nervous about a softer layer now, as I've read the softer layers sleep hotter. :unsure:


My guess is that because of your lighter weight and the firmness of the latex that it's your shoulders that aren't sinking in enough rather than your pelvis that is sinking in too much. Are you having actual symptoms of pain or discomfort (such as lower back pain) or is it more just a "feeling" of being slanted that you don't like.

If you are a side sleeper then someone of your lighter weight may do better with softer latex to "allow" your shoulders to sink in more until the torso comes into firmer contact with the mattress and then both the shoulders and pelvis would be "stopped" at the level of the firmer support layers. The firmer latex may be "holding up" your shoulders too much.

It may also be worth considering a shredded latex topper which will displace to some degree and can allow your more "pointy" shoulders to sink in more than the pelvis (which has more surface area) and may improve ventilation as well. You can see some sources for these in post #4 here . The benefits of this may be lost however with a thicker wool topper over it.

The Flobeds shredded latex topper has a zipper that can be opened to add or remove latex in the different sections to make them softer or firmer under different areas of your body.

Custom Sleep Design also makes a zoned latex topper where the part under the upper body is made softer than the part under the pelvis (and they can customize this to your body measurements).

I may just be one of those folks who are more sensitive than others to latex and foam. I recall sleeping on a friend's memory foam mattress a few years ago and I woke up sometime in the night and literally jumped out of bed because my skin actually felt like it was burning. Family members have memory foam mattresses and experience nothing negative -- they love it. My body just does better with natural materials. I only wear natural fibers too. No polyester in my closet, nothing that doesn't breathe.


This could very well be true and even though latex is more breathable than other types of foam ... it may be warmer than what you are used to sleeping on a mattress that had no foam at all. It would be unusual though that a wool topper on top of the latex would have heat issues for most people (unless perhaps the wool was very matted or compressed over time).

Just for the sake of my own clarity as well ... are you just sleeping on three toppers laid on top of each other (with no mattress cover) and with your wool topper, mattress protector (if any?) and your sheets on top of this?

What is the thickness of your toppers?

What are you using under the toppers to support your sleeping system?

Phoenix

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Last edit: 12 Jun 2013 14:12 by Phoenix.

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12 Jun 2013 14:40 #6 by firtree

My guess is that because of your lighter weight and the firmness of the latex that it's your shoulders that aren't sinking in enough rather than your pelvis that is sinking in too much. Are you having actual symptoms of pain or discomfort (such as lower back pain) or is it more just a "feeling" of being slanted that you don't like.


When I lay on my side, my arm starts to tingle within a few moments and my hips hurt. When on my back it's much better, tho today I woke up with a bit of lower back pain but haven't until now in this setup, so it might be something else causing that.

If you are a side sleeper then someone of your lighter weight may do better with softer latex to "allow" your shoulders to sink in more until the torso comes into firmer contact with the mattress and then both the shoulders and pelvis would be "stopped" at the level of the firmer support layers. The firmer latex may be "holding up" your shoulders too much.


This makes a lot of sense. So would that be a softer layer on top of the 3 layers I have now, or in place of the 28?

Custom Sleep Design also makes a zoned latex topper where the part under the upper body is made softer than the part under the pelvis (and they can customize this to your body measurements).


That sounds very nice. If I can figure out this "sleeping hot" maybe I'll check CSD. I like the concept of a zoned topper.

Just for the sake of my own clarity as well ... are you just sleeping on three toppers laid on top of each other (with no mattress cover) and with your wool topper, mattress protector (if any?) and your sheets on top of this?

What is the thickness of your toppers?

What are you using under the toppers to support your sleeping system?


Each latex topper is 3". No mattress. I have a 36, 31, and 28 ILD. My wool topper goes over that - it was 3" now is approx 2". No mattress protector and cotton sheets over the stack. The support right now is a solid wood platform. I recently purchased the flexible Ikea slat system (already assembled), and will either get an Ikea frame or create a way to use them with a non-Ikea frame. BB said the solid wood was ok -- I thought maybe it was the culprit. I do want to get off the solid soon, and see what the difference will be.

firtree

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12 Jun 2013 15:29 - 12 Jun 2013 15:35 #7 by Phoenix
Hi firtree,

Bearing in mind that comfort is very subjective and there are many variables involved (there are more than a just a few body types and sleeping positions which can make a difference) with your much lower weight I would tend towards a latex top layer in a softer range in the area of about 19 ILD. There would be little point in adding it as a separate topper because this would turn your current top layer into more of a "transition layer" (which has more of a support function and less of a pressure relief function) and you may need firmer layers closer to your body (providing less distance for your hips to "travel" and sink down before they are "stopped" by the firmer layers).

The ideal thickness of the top layer would depend on how much time you spend on your side vs other positions and on your body shape and weight distribution. For example if you are more "curvy" and the width of your waist is much less than your hips or you have relatively broad shoulders then you may need a thicker 3" layer to "fill in" the gaps, "allow" your shoulders to sink in enough, and provide a more evenly supportive surface between you and the mattress. The "gaps" and the pressure points (hips and shoulders) are more with side sleeping than with back sleeping so side sleepers generally need thicker comfort layers. If you were not as curvy or your shoulders weren't as wide (or you didn't sleep on your side) ... then you may do fine with a 2" top layer because you wouldn't need to sink in as much in the lighter parts of your body before your torso or your waist came into firmer contact with the mattress. The advantage of a thicker top topper would be additional pressure relief. The advantage of a thinner top topper would be better and firmer support under the pelvis (there would be less "room" for it to sink down)

I would also bear in mind that your wool topper (which it seems you will need for better ventilation) will reduce how much the latex will compress and its ability to take on the shape of your body.

BB said the solid wood was ok -- I thought maybe it was the culprit. I do want to get off the solid soon, and see what the difference will be.


The solid wood will certainly be supportive enough and wouldn't feel much different from solid slats although the Ikea system has flexible slats so it could be adjusted to firm up the area under the hips which could make a difference (although these tend to work better with a thinner mattress because the more foam there is the more the compression forces are absorbed before they reach the slatted foundation).

In terms of sleeping temperature ... the slats on the bottom probably won't make much difference vs a solid platform because it's the ventilation of the upper layers that will make more difference in humidity and temperature control. The ventilation between the mattress and the foundation (in combination with other risk factors) can make a difference though with the risk of developing mold and mildew issues as well as affect the risk of a higher dust mite population (see post #10 here ) although there is not general consensus about this and it depends on the other factors involved and where in the "range" of risk you are most comfortable.

Phoenix

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Last edit: 12 Jun 2013 15:35 by Phoenix.

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12 Jun 2013 16:28 #8 by firtree

Bearing in mind that comfort is very subjective and there are many variables involved (there are more than a just a few body types and sleeping positions which can make a difference) with your much lower weight I would tend towards a latex top layer in a softer range in the area of about 19 ILD. There would be little point in adding it as a separate topper because this would turn your current top layer into more of a "transition layer" (which has more of a support function and less of a pressure relief function) and you may need firmer layers closer to your body (providing less distance for your hips to "travel" and sink down before they are "stopped" by the firmer layers).

The ideal thickness of the top layer would depend on how much time you spend on your side vs other positions and on your body shape and weight distribution. For example if you are more "curvy" and the width of your waist is much less than your hips or you have relatively broad shoulders then you may need a thicker 3" layer to "fill in" the gaps, "allow" your shoulders to sink in enough, and provide a more evenly supportive surface between you and the mattress. The "gaps" and the pressure points (hips and shoulders) are more with side sleeping than with back sleeping so side sleepers generally need thicker comfort layers. If you were not as curvy or your shoulders weren't as wide (or you didn't sleep on your side) ... then you may do fine with a 2" top layer because you wouldn't need to sink in as much in the lighter parts of your body before your torso or your waist came into firmer contact with the mattress. The advantage of a thicker top topper would be additional pressure relief. The advantage of a thinner top topper would be better and firmer support under the pelvis (there would be less "room" for it to sink down)


This all makes sense. So the 19 or thereabouts would replace the 28 top layer. I did lay on a 19 ILD at a store a few months ago. It felt luxurious yet also strange to be soooo engulfed by it. It was on top of a 3" 31 ILD layer. This is difficult to figure out though I suppose if I decide to give the latex more time, I could keep swapping out the top layers within my 120 days.

The heat issue is a constant though. If I cannot find a way to fix that, it won't matter how perfect I get my layers to be.

I'll try again to make contact with Chuck, check out Custom Sleep Design and report in as to what I do, and how it all works.

Btw, in case he mentions it (because Mario did), do you think gel memory foam toppers are a lot cooler than latex and if so, could I put it under my wool or is that defeating the purpose of memory foam? I'm not thrilled with the idea of gel memory foam...

Thanks much,
firtree

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12 Jun 2013 18:54 - 22 Apr 2015 09:32 #9 by Phoenix
Hi firtree,

This all makes sense. So the 19 or thereabouts would replace the 28 top layer. I did lay on a 19 ILD at a store a few months ago. It felt luxurious yet also strange to be soooo engulfed by it. It was on top of a 3" 31 ILD layer. This is difficult to figure out though I suppose if I decide to give the latex more time, I could keep swapping out the top layers within my 120 days.


Yes ... if it was me I would replace the top layer.

A 2" topper would reduce the amount you sink in and the amount you were engulfed. Your lighter weight would increase the odds of success with a thinner top topper but it would still depend on your body type and the length of time you spent in each sleeping position.

The heat issue is a constant though. If I cannot find a way to fix that, it won't matter how perfect I get my layers to be.


Yes ... this would be important. It would be very rare for someone to have a heat issue with a wool topper on top of latex but as you know every "rule" has its exceptions and for the exceptions the 'rule" means nothing. Hopefully trying to sleep without your comforter can provide insights about whether the heat is being "trapped" in between your bedding and the mattress.

Btw, in case he mentions it (because Mario did), do you think gel memory foam toppers are a lot cooler than latex and if so, could I put it under my wool or is that defeating the purpose of memory foam? I'm not thrilled with the idea of gel memory foam...


Gel memory foam is an emerging category with many new variants being introduced and there are already many different versions of gel memory foam inside the category each with their own unique characteristics.

Your question is also complex because gel materials regulate temperature in different ways.

There are mainly two types of gel. One of these conducts heat from the body (like putting your hand on a marble countertop) and is "thermal conductive". It transports heat directly away from the body and releases it into the surrounding atmosphere (as long as it is cooler than the gel) without needing something to "carry" the heat away.

The second is phase change gel (or other phase change materials) which is a little different. It either absorbs heat and becomes more liquid or releases heat and becomes more solid (changes phase with different temperatures). These need to be "encapsulated" with another material so they don't "leak" when they are semi liquid. These tend to regulate temperature in both directions (cooling or warming depending on circumstances and on whether they are absorbing heat or releasing heat).

The third "cooling" technology is ventilation and moisture wicking which transports humidity and moisture (and the heat it contains) away from the body and either stores it inside a natural fiber (like wool) and away from the body or releases it to the surrounding atmosphere where it is dispersed. The water vapor is what transports the heat away from the body. If the water vapor and moisture is transported and/or stored away from the body then the humidity levels closer to the body are lower and more water vapor can be produced (perspiration) in response to excess heat which keeps the cycle going. Lower humidity levels next to the skin are more cooling than higher humidity levels (just like going outside on a hot humid day feels hotter than going outside on a hot day with the same temperature where the relative humidity is lower).

Lower humidity levels continuously allow more water vapor (and the heat it contains) to disperse into the air or be stored inside natural fibers (which in turn release them into the air more gradually) and away from the body so this type of cooling lasts throughout the night. This is the reason that wool is a great temperature regulator because it traps air which is an insulator when it is too cold but also allows humid air and moisture to be transported away from the body or stores moisture inside the fiber which keeps it away from the skin and keeps the cooling cycle going (which is why it is used in both cold and hot climates).

The first two "gel cooling technologies" are more temporary. In other words they will cool at first for a while until the temperatures equalize and then the foam would once again become an insulator and trap heat. It may provide an extra cooling effect when you are first going to sleep and the foam will feel cooler to the touch but neither of the gel technologies provide as long lasting cooling benefits as moisture wicking, storage, and ventilation. The higher the percentage of gel the more effective and longer lasting the effects of the gel will be.

One of the variables in the different gel materials besides the type of gel is the percentage of gel that the foam contains and this information isn't disclosed by the foam manufacturing companies so you can't compare them based on specs. Some types of gel memory foams may contain only 5% to 10% gel which would be a more temporary effect while others may contain 25% - 30% gel which could provide several hours of cooling benefits (again depending on other variables including ambient temperatures and the heat produced by the person sleeping on the mattress). In addition to different gel percentages ... some memory foam is also more open celled than others and even with gel memory foams ventilation is an important part of how they work (so the heat can be better dispersed). When the specs of a material aren't available then you are dependent on the knowledge and experience of a manufacturer or retailer that has your best interests at heart rather than the majority of salespeople in the industry that are only repeating the marketing stories they have been taught to sell a mattress.

Overall though and speaking as a category rather than for specific versions of material in each category (where the technical information isn't available) ... Talalay latex is more breathable than memory foam and less "insulating" so while it may not be as cool when you first go to bed or when you touch it ... over the course of the night it will sleep cooler than other types of foam materials including most gel memory foams. Of course this is just a general comparison between the two materials because the overall sleeping temperature of a mattress also depends on the other layers and materials that are in the upper layers including the foam, or natural fibers in the comfort layers, the quilting in the mattress, the type of mattress cover material, the type of mattress protector used, any toppers used, the sheets, and the bedding which all have a combined effect on sleeping temperature and the ability to either store or disperse moisture and heat. There is more about all the variables that can affect sleeping temperature in post #2 here .

Phoenix

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Last edit: 22 Apr 2015 09:32 by Phoenix.

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27 Jun 2013 10:53 #10 by firtree
Hi Phoenix,

Just a little update. I've been in contact with Chuck and he wanted me to stack the layers differently, which I already tried. I even put an air mattress under the top layer. It was kind of better, in that it had more responsiveness and helped my pressure points, tho overall felt a little weird. I finally ended up removing the 36 and am sleeping on the 31, 28, and folded my wool topper in half (so it's thicker) and that's the top layer. He has suggested swapping the 36 for a 19, so the setup would be 31, 28, 19. Each layer is 3 inches. Does this sound right to you? I had a thought this morning & wondered if the 28 should be a 24, though maybe it would be too soft??

I'm heading out of town soon, and the plan is to call them a couple days before I return to get the order processed -- so it won't be delivered while I'm gone and not too long after I'm back.

My back is in a difficult condition now. Something like sciatica is going on and my chiropractor thinks it's the mattress. My right shoulder is a bit frozen, probably from too much computer work, so side sleeping isn't too good. I lay mostly on my back now, and until I doubled up my wool topper, my tailbone was in sooo much pain.

It seems when one has back pain, it might make it harder to choose a mattress, though when I return, I do want to check out some cotton/wool spring mattresses. It will be interesting to see what I sleep on while away and what happens there... I haven't had time to call Flobeds or Custom Sleep yet, and they're on my list.

Thanks for your insights,
firtree

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