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normal Latex Mattress Choices

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07 Nov 2012 17:28 #1 by tsawyer

I have been researching mattresses for the past month ever since my $300 Ikea memory foam mattress has sagged. In the past week I have narrowed my options down to a couple choices for queen sized Latex Mattresses:

Tranquility
SleepEz
Cozypure
Ultimate Dreams

While I have the ability to afford mattresses up to $2500, the Ultimate Dreams is very tempting due to its $600 price tag. This would allow me to get a new foundation as well as sheets, comforter, etc... rather than just a mattress. I have read many, if not all, of the searched "Ultimate Dreams" and understand that it is one of the best quality/value for the price. With that said I (moreso my mom who is helping pay for the mattress, Poor college student :D) is skeptical of low priced mattresses because of the "You get what you pay for" arguement. Seeing as the company has not been around for a long time, is it fair to really judge the longevity based on its materials? And how long would it be before it began to sag? (I see it as cost per time. 5 years for $600 > 15 years for $2500)

Secondly, Because I would be able to go up to $2500, would a 100% natural Latex mattress be a better choice in the long run? I am having trouble deciding between tranquility, sleepez, and cozypure as there are no models that I know of around the San Jose Area.

Ill keep it short for now, and will ask more questions if I think of any.

Thanks!
Tyler

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07 Nov 2012 19:44 - 07 Nov 2012 19:55 #2 by Phoenix

Hi tsawyer,

With that said I (moreso my mom who is helping pay for the mattress, Poor college student ) is skeptical of low priced mattresses because of the "You get what you pay for" arguement. Seeing as the company has not been around for a long time, is it fair to really judge the longevity based on its materials?


Yes ... as a matter of fact it's the only way to make a reasonable estimate of the durability/longevity of a mattress. The label on a mattress, its warranty, or any stories that are attached to it has little to nothing to do with how long a mattress will last. In the case of the Ultimate Dreams ... they have been making mattresses for about 14 years (although their Amazon site is not that old) and while that's not an "old timer" in the mattress industry where many manufacturers have been in business for decades... they aren't "new" either :).

The idea of "you get what you pay for" is sometimes true and sometimes it isn't. In an apples to apples comparison between mattresses that are similar in terms of materials and components ... you will find that there is a huge difference between good value and poor value in every price range. Of course the goal of the site is to help people find the best value and eliminate the poor value choices.

And how long would it be before it began to sag? (I see it as cost per time. 5 years for $600 > 15 years for $2500)


There is no way to estimate this exactly and you can read about all the variables that are involved in a mattress' durability in post #2 here . As you can see ... how long a mattress will last for you (as opposed to someone else) depends on many factors and sagging is only one of them. All materials will soften (or in the case of fibers compress and become firmer) and how much "room" you have for foam softening before the mattress is unsuitable for you in terms of pressure relief and alignment is perhaps the biggest factor.

Having said that ... latex is generally the most durable of all the different types of foam (polyfoam, latex foam, memory foam) and higher quality versions of any foam will last longer than lower quality versions of the same type of material. The upper layers of a mattress are also subject to more wear and tear, mechanical compression, and softening (whether the softening leaves visible impressions or not) than the lower layers so in terms of durability this is where it's most important to use the most durable materials.

Secondly, Because I would be able to go up to $2500, would a 100% natural Latex mattress be a better choice in the long run? I am having trouble deciding between tranquility, sleepez, and cozypure as there are no models that I know of around the San Jose Area.


Once you are making comparisons between "good and good" ... then the final choices are all about individual preferences and the different options and materals that are more or less important to each person. There is more about these preferences in post #2 here . When you have eliminated the "worst" choices (which you mostly have although most people including me wouldn't consider Tranquility to be in quite the same "value range" as the options you are mentioning or some of the options that you haven't mentioned in post #21 here ) ... then the differences between two mattresses or suppliers are all about what is most important to you ... including of course the components, quality, options, and price of each. A longer conversation with each of them is probably the most effective way to narrow down your choices.

Secondly, Because I would be able to go up to $2500, would a 100% natural Latex mattress be a better choice in the long run? I am having trouble deciding between tranquility, sleepez, and cozypure as there are no models that I know of around the San Jose Area.


Again ... there really aren't any better/worse choices when it comes to personal preferences. A latex core is certainly different from having a polyfoam core and in an apples to apples comparison with polyfoam it is more durable, more resilient, more elastic, more adaptable to different weights and shapes, more supportive, more "natural" and has a different more "springy" and responsive feel than polyfoam but it is also more expensive and for some people ... a latex hybrid which has the benefits of latex in the upper layers (which are the most subject to wear and tear and contributes more to the overall "feel" of a mattress) is worth the cost tradeoff while for others it isn't. There is also more about the different types of latex in this article and in post #6 here which may help you make the choices that are best for you.

There are many latex options in the San Jose area and some of the better options are listed in post #2 here .

Hope this helps

Phoenix


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Last Edit: 07 Nov 2012 19:55 by Phoenix.

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07 Nov 2012 22:34 #3 by tsawyer

Heres a little background that maybe will help,

I am a heavily involved tae kwon do athlete, thus my body goes through a lot of rigorous activities. My hip joints bother me depending on the season/how much I am working out. So I guess one of my main goals is to have a bed that helps keep my body healthy and in shape (keeping my back aligned for longer and whatnot).

Saving money is always a good thing to me as I can definately use the saved $1500 for other things, but I do not want it to be at the cost of keeping my body healthy and/or having the same problems I have currently (random days I have neck stiffness most likely to my pillow, my lower back is constantly tight and I can feel it during practice).

I also want the massages/chiropractic benefits to last longer, which they do not due to a bad bed.

With that said, do you think that Ultimate Dreams mattress would suit my needs? Or should I splurge and go to sleepez?

Thanks for all your help!
Tyler

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08 Nov 2012 00:45 - 03 Aug 2015 18:17 #4 by Phoenix

Hi tsawyer,

There are many factors involved in what each person needs and prefers and I think that trying to determine what is "best" for you based on theory or other people's opinions is not as effective as personally lying (or sleeping) on mattresses with different combinations of materials to see and feel for yourself which works best for you. Regardless of which material combinations are "best" for you ... I also think it's important to use the best quality of materials possible in each budget range (which determines durability and how long a mattress will maintain its initial performance and the comfort and support which was the reason you purchased it).

There are several parts to healthier sleeping which of course can help your body recover more completely from stress and even injury and can lead to deeper and more healing sleep.

First is good alignment to keep the spine and joints in their "neutral" and least stressed position. This is primarily the function of the deeper layers of the mattress in combination with the thickness and softness of the comfort layers. Thinner comfort layers will put you closer to the support layers of the mattress which will "stop" the heavier parts from sinking in too far for best alignment. Neutral alignment and spinal decompression allows the joints and connected tissues to relax, rehydrate, and even heal.

Second is pressure relief which encourages good blood flow to the muscles and joints and outer tissues of the body. This is the function of the softer upper layers. In many cases ... younger or more athletic people often prefer slightly firmer or thinner layers here which can provide more freedom of movement and a feeling of being less "in" the mattress. As we age our need for pressure relief (thicker or softer comfort layers) can often become greater.

Third is good ventilation, moisture wicking, and humidity control so that you are sleeping in a drier environment which is more temperature regulating and can help to slow down the autonomic body functions. This means that the breathability of the mattress layers and components (primarily the upper layers but to some degree the mattress as a whole) in combination with the ticking/quilting materials and the mattress protector and bedding are all important parts of your choices.

Fourth is the ability to move freely on the mattress which is an important part of healthy sleeping. Most people will (and should) change position about a dozen times or more during the course of the night which can prevent blood pooling, muscles from becoming stiff and sore, and joints and spines from becoming stiff and maintaining flexibility.

Finally the mattress materials need to have the degree of "safety" from toxins and offgassing that you are comfortable with. For some this means using more natural materials while for others it can mean using synthetic materials (often less expensive) that have some level of certification, testing, or a reasonable assurance that the materials are "safe" by the standards that are important to you or that you may be sensitive to. For most people ... certifications like CertiPur (in the case of synthetic foams) or OekoTex or Eco-Institut (in the case of various types of latex) or organic certifications (in the case of fabrics or fibers) can be important.

The many variables and preferences between different people means that personally testing different types of materials is really the best way to know which combinations may work best for you and of course some research into the materials themselves can give you some idea of their durability and the type of performance you can expect over the course of time.

Beyond this ... you will find different people and manufacturers who prefer the properties or "feel" of one material or combination of materials over another but which materials you choose should always be based on personal preference. Any materials in combinations that are suitable for your specific circumstances can provide the combination of comfort/pressure relief and support/alignment you may need but will do it in different ways and with different "feels". In general terms you will find fast response foams (polyfoam and latex), slow response foams (memory foam and gel memory foam), natural and synthetic fibers, and innersprings are the primary choices you will have. There is some general information about all the different materials used in the comfort and support layers of a mattress in the overviews in the mattresses section of the site which can give you a sense of which materials may be preferable for you but in the end nothing can replace personal testing on mattresses because your own personal experience is always more valuable as a guideline than any theory or set of "specs". Once you have a sense of the types of material combinations that you prefer ... then if you do choose to make an online purchase you will have a much better idea of what you are buying and it's benefits.

I (or anyone) can't make these decisions for someone else except to help you know the differences between the different choices so you can weight the pros and cons of each relative to your own needs and preferences. There is absolutely no consensus even among the most knowledgeable people in the industry about the "best" material for any person or circumstances but there is consensus that no matter what materials you choose that PPP (Pressure relief, Posture and alignment, and Personal preferences) is the "best" way to choose and that higher quality materials will last longer than lower quality materials. I would personally prefer all latex for example because it has the unique quality of being both soft, supportive, and durable and many other benefits that are important to me but this would only be a benefit for someone who could feel the difference between a latex support core and a polyfoam support core and would benefit from the differences and of course whose budget allowed it or for someone who even likes the "feel" of latex in the first place (which certainly doesn't include everyone). While this may be my preference ... others who are just as knowledgeable would argue strongly for the benefits of a different choice or combination of materials or components and some may not even feel or notice the difference between them.

Of course all of this is also assuming that any mattress you purchase uses durable versions of the materials and components you prefer because if a mattress uses lower quality and less durable materials then they can soften and break down much too quickly relative to the price you paid which can result in the loss of the comfort, support, and "feel" which was the reason for your purchase in the first place. There is little value to a mattress purchase that only works well for a short time before the materials begin to soften and break down.

The bottom line is that the one thing that can help you the most is testing different types of mattresses and materials in person to see how you feel in general about the different combination of materials and types of mattresses so you are familiar with the basic types of mattresses that are available regardless of where you end up purchasing (see this article for more about the different types or categories of mattresses).

Both the Ultimate Dreams "latex hybrid" and SleepEz "all latex" mattresses would be great quality value choices (both are members here which means that I believe that they compete well with the best in the industry ) but only you can decide which would be best for you based on all the parts of your " personal value equation " that are most important to you.

Phoenix


Researching for a mattress?... Be sure to read The Mattress Shopping Tutorial.
Click here for TMU Discount Codes if purchasing from Our Trusted Members.
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Last Edit: 03 Aug 2015 18:17 by Phoenix.

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08 Nov 2012 04:42 - 08 Nov 2012 05:14 #5 by tsawyer

Thanks again for all the valuable information...

I believe I am going to go with the recommendation (or what I took to be a good recommendation) to go 100% latex, as it seems like It will be the best long term investment for me in both the sense of mental security and the physical product. One thing I've learned over the years is that taking care of my body is one of the most important investments I can make for my career.

With that said, there is one thing I am still confused about. What is the differences between the different thicknesses. Is it due to body mass and compression (heavier ---> more thickness?). I am 5'7", 130 lb (145 in off season). If my thought process is correct, I do not see a reason to spend an extra $200-$400 in order to have the same performance/comfort. It would be good to know if there is a significant difference between 9"/10" and 13" and then if the 9" and 10" warrents the $100 price difference.

Also, you said that athletes tend to like firmer mattresses, and my coach has also said that a firm mattress is better for an athlete. But all my life I have really enjoyed Plush mattresses (with support of course). I have been considering getting a firmer mattress but am skeptical if it will suit me. I want the mattress that will be best for me as an athlete and my health. That being said, will the firm and the medium/soft provide the same performance for me (I am a side sleeper. I believe I have read that side sleepers need softer mattresses in order for the back to be aligned correctly).

I appreciate everything you do for me as well as the rest of the MU community :D

Cheers mate!
Tyler

Last Edit: 08 Nov 2012 05:14 by tsawyer.

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08 Nov 2012 14:55 - 08 Nov 2012 14:59 #6 by Phoenix

Hi tsawyer,

I believe I am going to go with the recommendation (or what I took to be a good recommendation) to go 100% latex, as it seems like It will be the best long term investment for me in both the sense of mental security and the physical product.


Although it wasn't a "recommendation" (I leave that up to each person and their own "value equation") ... it would be my own personal preference ... all other things being equal and assuming that my budget comfortably allowed it. The most important part though is that it's the "best" for you and that you are comfortable with the tradeoff between the higher price and any differences in performance between a latex hybrid and an all latex mattress.

With that said, there is one thing I am still confused about. What is the differences between the different thicknesses. Is it due to body mass and compression (heavier ---> more thickness?). I am 5'7", 130 lb (145 in off season). If my thought process is correct, I do not see a reason to spend an extra $200-$400 in order to have the same performance/comfort. It would be good to know if there is a significant difference between 9"/10" and 13" and then if the 9" and 10" warrents the $100 price difference.


The difference between having 8" of latex and 9" of latex would be primarily the difference between the thickness of the softer comfort layer. The choice here is generally based on body type and sleeping positions with side sleepers generally needing a thicker comfort layer than back sleepers and stomach sleepers needing the thinnest firmest comfort layer of all. There is more about the different variables involved in this section about putting the layers together and different types of construction along with some general body type information here and some general sleeping position information here .

Because every layer works with every other layer and your choice of each layer can affect your choice of every other layer (both in terms of thickness and firmness), mattress layering can be quite complex if you go into too much detail and it's generally best to just have a general sense of the different options and their effect so you can have a more meaningful conversation with the manufacturer rather than feeling like you need to design a mattress yourself. Most manufacturers will have a set of "average" recommendations based on your basic information (which would be suitable for most people) and if you have some feedback from personal testing on mattresses that are similar they can easily take that into account as well.

In general ... most people would be fine with 8" - 9" of latex (depending on the thickness of the comfort layer they choose). there is more about the benefits of a thicker mattress and when it may be a good idea (mostly for much heavier weights) in post #14 here .

Also, you said that athletes tend to like firmer mattresses, and my coach has also said that a firm mattress is better for an athlete. But all my life I have really enjoyed Plush mattresses (with support of course). I have been considering getting a firmer mattress but am skeptical if it will suit me. I want the mattress that will be best for me as an athlete and my health. That being said, will the firm and the medium/soft provide the same performance for me (I am a side sleeper. I believe I have read that side sleepers need softer mattresses in order for the back to be aligned correctly).


The goal of a mattress (and there is more about this in the sections I linked to earlier) is to provide the best possible combination of softness/thickness in the upper layers (for pressure relief) and firmness in the deeper layers (for support/alignment) that provides the best balance between pressure relief softness and alignment/suppport firmness for the individual person. Different body types and sleeping styles need different combinations. "Plush" pressure relieving layers may be a good option but this can still be over firmer support layers so a mattress can be both "plush" and "firm" at the same time. In general ... softer/thicker comfort layers will provide a deeper pressure relieving cradle and you will sink deeper into the mattress while thinner/firmer comfort layers will provide a more shallow cradle (less pressure relief) and a feeling of being more on the mattress than in it. Different materials also play a role in this with memory foam being a more "in the mattress" and motion restricting material and latex being a more "on the mattress" and resilient feeling.

Because you are lighter than average weight ... you won't need the same degree of firmness for support as someone who was heavier (you won't sink into softer layers as much) but you may need softer comfort layers. Side sleepers don't need a "softer" mattress as much as they need thicker/softer comfort layers than the "flatter" sleeping positions so that the "gaps" in the side sleeping profile are filled in better and the pressure points are supporting less weight. The deeper layers can still be firm for support and "stop" the heavier pelvis/hips from sinking in further than they need to. Because all of this can vary with the different options that each manufacturer has available ... once you know the basics ... then a conversation with them which takes into account their greater knowledge of the specific layers and components they have available and their recommendations for someone of your body type and sleeping positions is generally the best way to make a decision about which of the layering combinations and components that they offer would be best for you.

The more personal testing you have done with different layering combinations ... the more they can tailor their suggestions (within the limits of the options they have available) to your testing instead of more standard recommendations that are based on "averages" (which work well for most people may not take into account any unique needs and preferences you discover in your testing)

Phoenix


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Last Edit: 08 Nov 2012 14:59 by Phoenix.

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09 Nov 2012 15:50 #7 by tsawyer

Thanks again for the reply!

I have one more question, do you know what the difference is between these two mattresses?

Natural 9000 9" - sleepez.com/latex-mattress-9000.htm

8" natural latex - sleepez.com/latex-mattress-sale.htm#


The two mattresses share the same 3 layers, so I assume that the missing 1 inch is from the covering? How much does that affect the feel? I am interested because there is a $400 price difference between the two.

Thanks

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10 Nov 2012 01:24 - 17 Jan 2013 23:01 #8 by Phoenix

Hi tsawyer,

These types of questions are usually better answered by the manufacturers themselves on a phone call (they are always much more knowledgeable about the specifics of their own mattresses than I am) but the basic differences are as follows ...

SleepEz Special:

Has two 3" layers of 10% Natural Dunlop in the bottom two layers that can be selected for firmness. These layers can be "split"

Uses a 2" layer of 100% natural Talalay in the 8" version (a more costly material than blended Talalay) in the comfort layer. It's recommended that this layer be a single layer because the cover is unquilted and you may feel the split otherwise.

Uses a stretch knit cover that is unquilted.

It is a "special" and has a lower profit margin so the 5% Mattress Underground discount doesn't apply (you get a "pillow bonus" instead

SleepEz 9000:

Uses your choice of either 100% natural Dunlop (same as the special) or blended Talalay (not available in the Special) in the bottom two 3" layers. Like the special these layers can be "split". The different materials available provides more layering options.

Uses your choice of 100% natural Dunlop or blended Talalay in the top 2" layer (the special uses the more costly 100% natural Talalay and you can read about the differences between different types of latex in this article ). The top layer can be split as well because this mattress comes with a wool quilted cover which will even out the feel of the split top layer.

Has a cotton cover quilted with wool (a more costly cover).

Forum members receive a 5% discount on the mattress.

Hope that helps

Phoenix


Researching for a mattress?... Be sure to read The Mattress Shopping Tutorial.
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Last Edit: 17 Jan 2013 23:01 by Phoenix.

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12 Nov 2012 12:58 #9 by tk35

This information is very helpful. I was having a difficult time finding relevant and detailed information until I found The Mattress Underground. I'm still researching but I am leaning toward a SleepEZ 9000 or 10000. I'm not sure the SleepEZ Special would work since my wife sleeps on her side.

Phoenix, thanks to you and the members for all the great information.

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12 Nov 2012 23:52 #10 by Phoenix

Hi tk35,

Your very welcome ... and thanks for the kind words :)

SleepEz are great to talk to and they will give you some good guidance about matching their mattresses to your body type and sleeping positions.

Phoenix


Researching for a mattress?... Be sure to read The Mattress Shopping Tutorial.
Click here for TMU Discount Codes if purchasing from Our Trusted Members.
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