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Checking on specs -- Lake Mattress, Mooresville, NC 30 Jul 2013 20:50 #1

Thanks for your site. I'm learning much about mattresses and the mattress industry. Started with the national brands, but after research -- this site and others -- looking at the smaller manufacturers.

I won't buy through the internet -- need to test out the mattress first.

So, visited Lake Mattress, Mooresville NC and like the Gel Comfort-130 mattress best.

Here are the specs:

3 inches Gel-Memory Foam (TM) -- 4 lb. density
3 inches HDX Visco Memory Foam -- 4 lb. density
2 inches Latex Firm -- 40 ILD (I forgot to ask if Dunlop, Tallaley or blend, etc.)
4.25 Soy Base Foam -- 2.4 lb. polyfoam with ILD of 36

Cost close to 2k for queen set and I think the sheet he printed out for me was 200 higher than price on mattress in store. I will have to call about that.

So I think after reading all your info on memory foam, polyfoam and latex, that these specs would qualify for a good quality mattress?

Your help is appreciated!

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Checking on specs -- Lake Mattress, Mooresville, NC 30 Jul 2013 23:34 #2

Hi NightOwl,

Lake Mattress has some very good quality and value mattresses available and are certainly one of your better choices.

The Gel Comfort 130 has 6" of medium quality/density memory foam and then the other layers (the latex and polyfoam) are all good quality.

I would have two cautions with this mattress though.

First of all that's a lot of medium density memory foam and when you have this much medium density 4 lb memory foam there is a greater risk of foam softening and the loss of comfort and support (especially support) that goes with it ... especially for people that are above average weight.

The second caution is to make sure that you spend lots of time testing this mattress for PPP (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and personal preferences). The risk with this much memory foam is that you can start off the night in good alignment but memory foam has a property called "creep" which means it will continue to soften over the course of the night (just because of the time it remains compressed and not just because of temperature and humidity) and with this much memory foam in a mattress there is some risk of starting off the night with good alignment and then waking up in the morning out of alignment as your heavier pelvis can end up sinkin in too deeply relative to the rest of your body.

For most people a little less memory foam and/or some higher density memory foam in the mix that is a little more supportive (lets your pelvis sink in less) may be a "safer" choice

Your own testing of course is the most important thing and may indicate that this is the perfect mattress for you regardless of any cautions or theory but I would always be very careful with this much 4 lb memory foam and would probably spend at least 20 - 30 minutes completely relaxed (to make sure the memory foam has time to warm up) and test for alignment in all your sleeping positions very carefully. If you are in the 200 lb range or higher I would also be very aware of the possibility that this much 4 lb memory foam will likely soften more than higher density memory foam and could have a greater effect on your comfort and especially support/alignment over time than comfort layers that are a little thinner and include some higher density memory foam so I would be careful that you aren't already on the edge of a mattress that is too soft so that foam softening doesn't take you over the edge too quickly.

Phoenix
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Last edit: by phoenix.

Checking on specs -- Lake Mattress, Mooresville, NC 31 Jul 2013 07:41 #3

Thanks for feedback.

Lot of information on ILD, density, quality, etc. to figure out. Can you take a look at Lake Mattress site and provide a good starting point for quality?

I'm 5'10", 140 lbs, side sleeper, middle-aged woman with some arthritis and rehabilitating a sports injury that affects back, gluts, hamstrings. Taking a long time to heal injury but so much better now and I am almost 100% with all my sport activities. Shoulders are are on the broad side. I want firm support, but softer mattresses feels great to me to alleviate pressure/pain issues. Of course I am concerned about longevity, durability of materials in the bed and don't want it to break down.

Saw thread on latex mattresses at OMF. One of them is way too soft and other other was only ok for me. Memory foam mattress there seemed fine, but on the firmer side. Here's the specs given to me at store (they are not on website):

4 inches high density memory foam composed of:
1.5 inches 8 lb 10ILD
2.5 inches 5 lb. 10 ILD
Air flow foam layer to reduce heat/ increase response time (this was almost see through, 1/4 to 1/2 inch)
6 inches 2.2 lb. density 30 ILD high density foam core

What do you think of this one?

May make the trip to Colton Mattress in Asheville. Not much info on website. Called and did not get a lot of specific information about materials and densities of foams used. Will call again. Have to know more in order to make the trip.

Thanks again!

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Checking on specs -- Lake Mattress, Mooresville, NC 31 Jul 2013 09:55 #4

Hi NightOwl,

Lot of information on ILD, density, quality, etc. to figure out. Can you take a look at Lake Mattress site and provide a good starting point for quality?


All of the mattresses at Lake Mattress use good quality materials and have good value. In terms of PPP though (Posture and alignment, Pressure relief, and Personal preferences) there are too many variables and unknowns to use a formula based on theory or specs to choose a mattress. There are some links to some generic guidelines in mattress firmness/comfort levels in post #2 here but these are only generic and meant to give you some insights into what to look for and your own careful and objective testing and experience using the testing guidelines is the only way to know which mattress is most suitable for your specific needs and preferences. Each person can be unique in terms of their body shape, weight distribution, and all the positions they sleep in.

I want firm support, but softer mattresses feels great to me to alleviate pressure/pain issues. Of course I am concerned about longevity, durability of materials in the bed and don't want it to break down.


All of this is common for all people (firmer even support, pressure relieving comfort layers, and durable materials) but of course each person has their own variation of firmer/softer/durable. The goal is to make sure your spine and joints are in good alignment in all your sleeping positions (support), to make sure that your body weight is spread out over the surface of the mattress and not just on your pressure points (pressure relief) and of course that the quality of the materials is good so that the mattress doesn't soften and break down prematurely (this can't be felt in a showroom which is why it's so important to know the details of all the layers in your mattress ... especially in the upper layers which are the most likely to break down the fastest). There are also other things that can be important preferences as well such as the ease of movement on the mattress, motion isolation, temperature regulation, and the overall subjective "feel" of the mattress.

Primary support that "stops" the pelvis from sinking down too far and tilting the pelvis (which is the main thing that controls the natural curve of the lumbar spine) is the role of the deeper layers which need to be firmer. These are usually called the support layers. The upper layers provide secondary support and pressure relief and need to be soft enough to allow you to sink in and "cradle" your body to fill in and provide lighter support under the gaps in your sleeping profile (such as the inward lumbar curve or waist) and to redistribute pressure away from the pressure points or "bony prominences" (hips, shoulders, etc). The key for all people is firm enough in the support layers, soft and thick enough in the comfort layers, and durable enough depending on body weight and budget (see post #4 here about all the factors that can affect the durability of a mattress). Too firm or too soft can both have a negative effect on pressure relief and alignment.

Here's the specs given to me at store (they are not on website):

4 inches high density memory foam composed of:
1.5 inches 8 lb 10ILD
2.5 inches 5 lb. 10 ILD
Air flow foam layer to reduce heat/ increase response time (this was almost see through, 1/4 to 1/2 inch)
6 inches 2.2 lb. density 30 ILD high density foam core

What do you think of this one?


Unfortunately they no longer make these (due to a patent infringement claim by Tempurpedic apparently) and are only selling their remaining stock. That''s unfortunate because they use good quality high density memory foam similar to the Tempurpedic HD line such as the Rhapsody and have good value. Again though only your own testing can determine it's suitability for your body type and sleeping style. It would be much firmer than a mattress with thicker layers of lower density memory foam and for some people it may feel too firm. The airflow layer is called reticulated foam of fast dri foam which highly breathable and is the type of foam that will allow water and air to go right through it.

thetradeoff between higher and lower density memory foams is that higher density memory foams are more durable (up toabout 6 lbs or so where the durability benefits start to level off) but are usually slower to respond to heat and pressure (have more of a "sleeping in sand feeling) and can feel firmer which is why lower density 4 lb memory foams are often used for people who like a softer feel.

May make the trip to Colton Mattress in Asheville. Not much info on website. Called and did not get a lot of specific information about materials and densities of foams used. Will call again. Have to know more in order to make the trip.


A forum search on Colton (you can just click this) will bring up more information and feedback about them that you can scan.

Phoenix
Researching for a mattress?... Be sure to read The Mattress Shopping Tutorial.
Click here for TMU Discount Codes if purchasing from Our Trusted Members.
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Last edit: by phoenix.

Checking on specs -- Lake Mattress, Mooresville, NC 31 Jul 2013 18:02 #5

Thanks for the direction to the other posts. I have read them before. Again, still putting it all together and figuring out how all that info applies once you are on a showroom floor.

You compared the OMF memory foam bed to the Temperpedic Rhapsody. I have not been on that bed, preferring the Temperpedic Cloud-Luxe, which is on the softer side, so you can see where I am in the search for pressure relief. I now know more about quality, durability and support, so still trying to find that right mattress for me.

I did call Colton Mattress in Asheville and had a great conversation with Mike, who I see is mentioned several times after I searched the forum for "Colton" as you suggested. Planning on making the trip on Friday.

Grateful for your advice.

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Checking on specs -- Lake Mattress, Mooresville, NC 31 Jul 2013 23:47 #6

Hi NightOwl,

You compared the OMF memory foam bed to the Temperpedic Rhapsody.


Yes ... but only in terms of the quality and density of the memory foam layers. I don't know how they will compare in terms of "feel" or PPP for you.

Thanks for the direction to the other posts. I have read them before. Again, still putting it all together and figuring out how all that info applies once you are on a showroom floor.


On the showroom floor your personal testing using the testing guidelines for comfort/pressure relief and support/alignment and any other preferences you can test for is the best way to compare mattresses in terms of PPP. Once you know a mattress is suitable for your needs and preferences then this along with knowing the quality of the materials will help you make meaningful comparisons in terms of comfort, support, and quality/durability which are among the most important parts of comparing the relative value of two mattresses.

I would narrow down your choices at each manufacturer or retailer you visit to one finalist (as if they were the only place you could make a purchase from) and then make your final choice between the "best" at each location.

I'm looking forward to your feedback when you visit Colton's.

Phoenix
Researching for a mattress?... Be sure to read The Mattress Shopping Tutorial.
Click here for TMU Discount Codes if purchasing from Our Trusted Members.
For any mattress questions Ask An Expert on our forum

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Last edit: by phoenix.
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