>

Welcome to The Mattress Underground FORUM! :cheer:
The first place to start your research is the Mattress Shopping Tutorial
Select the Search Forum tab below to gain access to answers to many mattress related questions.
Select the Ask An Expert tab below to reach out to any of our Expert Members for guidance and advice.

Welcome to The Mattress Underground FORUM! :cheer:
  • Page:
  • 1

TOPIC:

Boxsprings 03 Mar 2016 18:19 #1

We are contemplating buying a basic boxspring with our latex mattress -- really just a wood box with a fabric cover. How much difference does the box spring make in terms of durability, feel, etc. ofo a mattress?

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Boxsprings 03 Mar 2016 18:55 #2

Hi Kaye,

I'm not sure you are clear between the difference between a box spring and a foundation. A box spring has springs inside it that flex under the mattress and there are very few one sided mattresses today that use them as a support system and in many cases they will invalidate a mattress warranty. Most mattresses in the industry today need a steel or wooden bedframe with a foundation that has minimal to no flex (vs a box spring that flexes) or a platform bed which also has little to no flex under the mattress. There are many in the industry that mix up the terminology between box springs and foundations even though they are very different products.

There is more information about the different support systems (bedframes and foundations or platform beds) that are generally suitable for different types of mattresses and some examples of each of them in post #1 here .

An all latex mattress will generally do best with a firm, flat, and evenly supportive support surface underneath it that has minimal to no flex under the mattress and for larger sizes with at least one center support beam that has good support to the floor to prevent any sagging in the middle of the mattress. The components need to be strong and durable and stable enough to support the weight of the mattress and the people sleeping on it without some of the parts bending, sagging, or breaking over time. The support surface under the mattress should have enough surface area to prevent the mattress from sagging through any gaps or spaces in the support surface over time but still allow some airflow under the mattress. I would suggest that in a slatted support system (either a foundation on a steel or wooden bedframe or a platform bed with a slatted support surface) that any gaps between the slats are no more than 3" (with 1 x 3 slats) although less than that would be better yet.

A suitable foundation should not have any effect on the feel or durability of a latex mattress and should be very similar to having your mattress on the floor. If a support system (bedframe and foundation or a platform bed) does have an effect on the feel or durability of a latex mattress then with the exception of a few thinner two sided latex mattresses that are designed to be used on a box spring ... it would be the wrong support system.

Phoenix
Researching for a mattress?... Be sure to read The Mattress Shopping Tutorial.
Click here for TMU Discount Codes if purchasing from Our Trusted Members.
For any mattress questions Ask An Expert on our forum

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Last edit: by Administrator TMU. Reason: Updating link to https: status

Boxsprings 04 Mar 2016 06:53 #3

We are contemplating buying a basic boxspring with our latex mattress -- really just a wood box with a fabric cover.


Be very careful of the wood platform foundations commonly found at sleep shops, as many from the larger brands are wholly inadequate for a latex mattress. Ask to see inside of the product (you usually can see from the underside through the dust cover) and look at the top cross slat deck. You'll usually only find 6-9 cross slats with a piece of cardboard on top of it. You don't want that. Preferable is what Phoenix described - no more than 3" between slats. Usually looking at 15-18 cross slats on the top deck for a queen/king. Look for corner bracing to stop the product from racking, and bottom side bracing to stop the sides from bending in. And no cardboard. Look for a fabric/felt/coir top deck that allows for air circulation. There are also ready-to-assemble (RTA) versions available from quite a few places online that are quite sturdy and can ship via UPS.

Hopefully that helps you out.
Jeff Scheuer, The Beducator™ Owner of Mattress To Go
Researching for a mattress?... read The Mattress Shopping Tutorial.
Click here for TMU Discount Codes if purchasing from Trusted Members

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Last edit: by MattressToGo. Reason: spelling

Boxsprings 04 Mar 2016 14:12 #4

thank you

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Boxspring replacement 28 Mar 2016 15:27 #5

I was wondering how important is it to replace a boxspring with a new mattress.
I'm leaning toward the Brooklyn Best Mattress Ever, but I'm not seeing an issue with my burrent boxspring.
Good idea to replace or will I be able to tell if it needs to be replaced when I get the new mattress on it?

Thanks!
And thank you for this site, it's been quite helpful.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Boxspring replacement 28 Mar 2016 15:40 #6

Hi BCoulton,

I was wondering how important is it to replace a boxspring with a new mattress.


If you scroll back to post #2 in this topic it will explain more about the difference between a box spring and a foundation.

If you have a foundation (not a box spring) and it's still in good condition and is still perfectly flat and there are no soft spots or sagging in the support surface and it's suitable for the type of mattress you purchase then it would be fine to keep it.

If you have a box spring that has springs inside it that can flex under the mattress (vs a foundation that has very little to no flex) then I would replace it since most foam mattresses or one sided mattresses sold today need a suitable foundation (or a suitable platform bed) not a box spring.

Phoenix
Researching for a mattress?... Be sure to read The Mattress Shopping Tutorial.
Click here for TMU Discount Codes if purchasing from Our Trusted Members.
For any mattress questions Ask An Expert on our forum

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Last edit: by Phoenix.

Boxspring replacement 29 Mar 2016 04:03 #7

Thanks!
I guess I will need to get a Foundation then.
Any thoughts about perhaps putting that foundation on the box springs?
I have a bad back and I'm fairly tall so if I could add height without buying a new frame that would be great.

Thank you once again!
Bob

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Boxspring replacement 29 Mar 2016 06:07 #8

BCoulton wrote:

Any thoughts about perhaps putting that foundation on the box springs?


Do not place a new HD foundation on top of an old box spring. Your foundation needs to be placed upon a firm and sturdy surface that is flat and doesn't flex, not only for sleeping comfort and durability, but for safety. If you need to make your bed taller, look at a stable riser system for your bed frame, or find a platform bed that is higher off of the ground and start with that. If you still want to stack two units beneath your mattress, you'd be better off stacking two HD foundations on top of each other, although I don't recommend it.
Jeff Scheuer, The Beducator™ Owner of Mattress To Go
Researching for a mattress?... read The Mattress Shopping Tutorial.
Click here for TMU Discount Codes if purchasing from Trusted Members

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Boxspring replacement 30 Mar 2016 06:50 #9

As always great advice from Jeff. I would just like to add that I'm not a big fan of of the loose slats on the KD wood foundations. On my KD foundation I screwed the slats down to the sides and middle rails with 1 1/4" #6 drywall screws. You can also use Grip Tite Construction screws . I used a countersink bit to set the screws even with the surface of the slats. This will strengthen the foundation, keep the slats from moving, and help straighten out any slats that have bowed up. The downside to this is in disassembly if you move around a lot.
ADMIN NOTE:Removed 404 page link | Archived Footprint: grip-rite.com/us/en/fasteners/screws/general-purpose-construction-screw

Jeff stated in another post that the your body weight and the mattress will also help to straighten the slats if you choose not to screw them down.

I also like the KD wood foundations because they come with zip on covers that can easily be removed if you have to fix something , i.e., a broken slat.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Last edit: by Administrator TMU. Reason: Removed Page Not Found Link (404 Error) and Updating link to https: status

Boxspring replacement 30 Mar 2016 07:36 #10

BobP wrote:

On my KD foundation I screwed the slats down to the sides and middle rails with 1 1/4" #6 drywall screws

Securing the cross slats to the lip on the side rails is an excellent way to increase structural integrity and also minimize noise. Your comment about countersinking is a must, as you don't want the head of the screw to protrude and potentially damage the bottom of your mattress when rotating the product. I would add that a self-tapping wood screw is a type that is commonly used in the furniture industry and I would recommend using these to secure your slats as well.
Jeff Scheuer, The Beducator™ Owner of Mattress To Go
Researching for a mattress?... read The Mattress Shopping Tutorial.
Click here for TMU Discount Codes if purchasing from Trusted Members

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

Last edit: by Administrator TMU. Reason: Updating link to https: status
  • Page:
  • 1
Moderators: NikkiTMU
TheMattressUndergounf
TMU
TheMattressUndergounf