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Comfort layer maybe too thick 28 Jun 2016 13:20 #1

Hello,

If i failed to place this thread in the right category please move it as needed.

Approximately two months ago we purchase a latex mattress. Prior to our purchase we laid on various latex cores. My wife preferred soft core on top and I preferred medium core on top but found no problems while laying on soft core. Based on that 30 min trial and our body weights of 180 -225 lb, we ordered 3" dunlop extra firm, 6" dunlop firm and 3" talalay soft.
I cannot be sure the 3" talalay soft is truly talalay without cutting it across width. Seller marked Talalay core as 25 ild, latter they stated employee error as their soft dunlop cores are 25 ild. Employee thought core was dunlop.

Getting to point now. After two months of sleeping on this mattress, I awake with low back pain. From what I have read this is most likely the result of comfort layer being too thick. In practical terms it makes no difference if the comfort layer I sleep on is Talalay or Dunlop as it needs to be replaced. Or at least I should try something else then consider replacing this layer based on trial. Trials would involve my side only. My wife's side would not change.

Possible trials:
Purchase 3" thick medium Dunlop core, create a split comfort layer. Medium for me, soft for her.
Purchase 2" thick soft Dunlop or Talalay core, create a split comfort layer. Top of bed would be uneven.

I typically fall asleep on my side and awake on my back. I suspect I sleep on my back most of the time.
Please offer your opinion as to how to approach finding right latex comfort layer. Buying and returning maybe necessary but would rather avoid the return.

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Last edit: by bobrfish. Reason: check box for notification of replies, new feature for me

Comfort layer maybe too thick 28 Jun 2016 13:52 #2

Hi bobrfish,

Getting to point now. After two months of sleeping on this mattress, I awake with low back pain. From what I have read this is most likely the result of comfort layer being too thick. In practical terms it makes no difference if the comfort layer I sleep on is Talalay or Dunlop as it needs to be replaced. Or at least I should try something else then consider replacing this layer based on trial. Trials would involve my side only. My wife's side would not change.


While it's not possible to "diagnose" mattress comfort issues on a forum with any certainty because they can be very complex and there are too many unique unknowns, variables, and complexities involved that can affect how each person sleeps on a mattress in terms of "comfort", firmness, and PPP or any "symptoms" they experience ... there is more about the most common symptoms that people may experience when they sleep on a mattress and the most likely (although not the only) reasons for them in post #2 here .

The most common reason for lower back pain would be comfort layers that are either too soft and/or too much thickness for that particular softness (a thinner layer of the same firmness can sometimes work well because more of the firmness of the layer underneath it would "come through" and affect the overall firmness of the upper layers).

Possible trials:
Purchase 3" thick medium Dunlop core, create a split comfort layer. Medium for me, soft for her.
Purchase 2" thick soft Dunlop or Talalay core, create a split comfort layer. Top of bed would be uneven.

I typically fall asleep on my side and awake on my back. I suspect I sleep on my back most of the time.
Please offer your opinion as to how to approach finding right latex comfort layer. Buying and returning maybe necessary but would rather avoid the return.


I'm not sure whether your mattress was a DIY mattress where you purchased your individual layers and the cover separately or if you purchased a component latex mattress "kit" from a retailer or manufacturer that allows for layer exchanges. If you purchased a component latex mattress kit that allows for layer exchanges then if I was in your shoes I would probably ask them if you can exchange your soft layer for a split layer that includes a soft side for your wife and a medium side for you so that you would have the same thickness on each side of the mattress without having a "ridge" in the middle of the mattress which may be quite noticeable.

If you purchased a DIY mattress and you have the option to exchange the top layer for the same "split" layer then I would do the same thing.

If you can't exchange the top layer for a split layer then as you mentioned you could cut your top layer in half and order a medium layer for your side. There are some instructions for cutting or gluing foam layers (either for zoning or for side to side split layers) in post #3 here and some additional posts with more comments and pictures about cutting foam in post #19 here and post #1 here .

I would also keep in mind that the only way to know for certain whether any combination of materials and components will work well for any specific person will be based on your own personal experience so the options you have after a purchase to return or exchange the new layers may become a more important part of your personal value equation.

Another option you could try would be to sleep on the bottom two layers (3" Dunlop extra firm and 6" Dunlop firm) without the soft top layer to see how and "how much" your "symptoms" changed and if you need any additional softness and pressure relief then you could use the information about choosing a topper (which would also apply to choosing a top layer) in post #2 here and the topper guidelines it links to in post #8 here which along with a conversation with a reliable and knowledgeable supplier (that can provide you with good information about how their toppers compare to each other or to other toppers they are familiar with that are available on the market) so you can use your actual sleeping experience as a reference point and guideline to help you choose the type, thickness, and firmness for a topper that has the least possible risk and the best chance for success. Again ... a good exchange/return policy can also reduce the risk of an online topper (or top layer) purchase so I would make sure you are comfortable with the options you have available after a purchase just in case the top layer you choose doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for.

Phoenix
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Last edit: by Administrator TMU. Reason: Updating link to https: status

Comfort layer maybe too thick 02 Jul 2016 16:04 #3

Phoenix,

Thanks for your thoughts. Mattress is DIY kit, that is everything was purchased at one time from same seller. I may have a few weeks left for exchange.
Since posting my questions here, I left town for a few days and was essentially forced to sleep on Sealy posturepedic mattress resting on a wire frame support. It is likely the mattress is low end posturepedic. It felt firm with no comfort layer at all. Each morning I awoke with a back ache significantly worse than sleeping on my own latex mattress. This reminded me of a vacation last Winter when sleeping on poor mattress elicited significant lower back pain. Typically a few hours after arising the back ache will disappear but it is not the right way to start the day.
My tentative conclusion is my lower back muscles are likely too weak for maintaining spine alignment as I sleep. Would expect more problems during day but perhaps there is compensation by other muscle groups that may not be the best for my spine but prevent pain. My secondary conclusion is a latex mattress is helpful in aligning spine correctly. Lastly, will consider your suggestions to approach a more perfect alignment of spine as I sleep.

Thanks again.

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Comfort layer maybe too thick 02 Jul 2016 16:48 #4

Hi bobrfish,

Thanks for the update.

Since posting my questions here, I left town for a few days and was essentially forced to sleep on Sealy posturepedic mattress resting on a wire frame support. It is likely the mattress is low end posturepedic. It felt firm with no comfort layer at all. Each morning I awoke with a back ache significantly worse than sleeping on my own latex mattress. This reminded me of a vacation last Winter when sleeping on poor mattress elicited significant lower back pain. Typically a few hours after arising the back ache will disappear but it is not the right way to start the day.


If you have lower back pain when you wake up in the morning and it goes away once you get up and stretch and move around for a few hours then it would generally be the result of a mattress that isn't the best "match" for you in terms of spinal alignment.

It's good to hear that your mattress seems to be an improvement over the Sealy you slept on even if it's not "perfect" but if you still have time left on the exchange period then it may be worthwhile exchanging for a medium layer so you can try it out for a few days to see if it's an improvement vs the soft and then you can keep the one that works best for you and return the other one.

Phoenix
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Click here for TMU Discount Codes if purchasing from Our Trusted Members.
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