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normal SleepEz v. Foam Sweet Foam v. PlushBeds? Natural v. Organic? 3 layers v. 4?

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19 May 2017 07:06 #1 by smdds

Hi-
First timer here. Cannot decide - Sleep EZ and Plush offer organic, FSF does not - is it worth the $$?
FSF says 4 layers best and most common, others go with 3 layers. (We are male, 5'9", 162 lbs, back and side sleeper, stiff hips, lower back, and female 5'4", 120 lbs., side mostly, not that picky)
All have tradeability, which is good. FSF warranty is longest. How to pull trigger? Thanks.

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19 May 2017 12:10 #2 by Phoenix

Hi smdds,

Welcome to the forum! :)

First timer here.


As this is your first time to the forum, I’ll provide a bit of standard helpful information, and then I’ll address a few of your more specific questions.

While I can certainly help with "how" to choose ... It's not possible to make specific suggestions or recommendations for either a mattress, manufacturers/retailers, or combinations of materials or components because the first "rule" of mattress shopping is to always remember that you are the only one that can feel what you feel on a mattress and there are too many unknowns, variables, and personal preferences involved that are unique to each person to use a formula or for anyone to be able to predict or make a specific suggestion or recommendation about which mattress or combination of materials and components or which type of mattress would be the best "match" for you in terms of "comfort", firmness, or PPP or how a mattress will "feel" to you or compare to another mattress based on specs (either yours or a mattress), sleeping positions, health conditions, or "theory at a distance" that can possibly be more reliable than your own careful testing (hopefully using the testing guidelines in step 4 of the tutorial) or your own personal sleeping experience (see post #2 here ).

I'd suggest that you first start your mattress shopping research by reading the mattress shopping tutorial here but two of the most important links in the tutorial that I would especially make sure you've read are post #2 here which has more about the different ways to choose a suitable mattress (either locally or online) that is the best "match" for you in terms of "comfort", firmness, and PPP that can help you assess and minimize the risks of making a choice that doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for and post #13 here which has more about the most important parts of the "value" of a mattress purchase which can help you make more meaningful quality/value comparisons between mattresses in terms of suitability (how well you will sleep), durability (how long you will sleep well), and the overall value of a mattress compared to your other finalists based on all the parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you (including the price of course and the options you have available after a purchase if your choice doesn't turn out as well as you hoped for).

While again nobody can speak to how any specific mattress will "feel" for someone else or whether it will be a good "match" in terms of comfort, firmness, and PPP because this is too subjective and relative to different body types, sleeping positions, and individual preferences, sensitivities, and circumstances and you are the only one that can feel what you feel on a mattress ... outside of PPP (which is the most important part of "value"), the next most important part of the value of a mattress purchase is durability which is all about how long you will sleep well on a mattress. This is the part of your research that you can't see or "feel" and assessing the durability and useful life of a mattress depends on knowing the specifics of its construction and the type and quality of the materials inside it regardless of the name of the manufacturer on the label or how a mattress feels in a showroom or when it is relatively new so I would always make sure that you find out the information listed here so you can compare the quality of the materials and components to the durability guidelines here to make sure there are no lower quality materials or weak links in a mattress that would be a cause for concern relative to the durability and useful life of a mattress before making any purchase.

In its simplest form ... choosing the "best possible" mattress for any particular person really comes down to FIRST finding a few knowledgeable and transparent retailers and/or manufacturers (either locally or online) that sell the types of mattresses that you are most interested in that are in a budget range you are comfortable with and that you have confirmed will provide you with the all the information you need about the materials and components inside the mattresses they sell so you will be able to make informed choices and meaningful comparisons between mattresses and then ...

1. Careful testing (hopefully using the testing guidelines in the tutorial) to make sure that a mattress is a good match for you in terms of "comfort", firmness, and PPP ... and/or that you are comfortable with the options you have available to return, exchange, or "fine tune" the mattress and any costs involved if you can't test a mattress in person or aren't confident that your mattress is a suitable choice.

2. Checking to make sure that there are no lower quality materials or weak links in a mattress you are considering relative to your weight/BMI range that could compromise the durability and useful life of the mattress.

3. Comparing your finalists for "value" based on #1 and #2 and all the other parts of your personal value equation that are most important to you.

Sleep EZ and Plush offer organic, FSF does not - is it worth the $$?


Most people that are looking for an "organic" mattress or materials are usually concerned more with "safety" than whether the materials have an actual organic certification and they usually aren't aware that an organic certification isn't the same thing as a safety certification. There is more information about the three different levels of organic certifications in post #2 here and some of the benefits of an organic certification in post #3 here and there is more about the different types of organic and safety certifications such as Oeko-tex, Eco-Institut, Greenguard Gold, C2C, and CertiPUR-US in post #2 here and more about some of the differences between organic and safety certifications in post #2 here and there are also some comments in post #42 here that can help you decide whether an organic certification is important to you for environmental, social, or personal reasons or whether a "safety" certification is enough.

All the latex you are likely to encounter (either Dunlop or Talalay that is made with either natural or synthetic rubber or a blend of both) will also have a reliable certification such as Oeko-Tex, Eco-Institut, Greenguard Gold or C2C and based on actual testing I would consider any type or blend of latex (regardless of whether it is synthetic, natural, or blended) to be a very "safe" material in terms of harmful substances and VOC's (offgassing). Any type or blend of latex will also be a very durable material relative to other types of foam such as memory foam or polyfoam as well.

In the end, an organic certification would be a part of your own personal value equation as to its worth, as compared to other similar mattresses that have safety certifications that test for harmful substances and VOCs that would be just as suitable and just as safe but are in much lower budget ranges. SleepEZ also offers their latex line in a “Natural Select” version that is not organic certified, at a lower cost. Both SleepEZ and Foam Sweet Foam are members of this site which means that I think very highly of them and that I believe that they compete well with the best in the industry in terms of their quality, value, service, knowledge, and transparency. They are extremely knowledgeable about latex and different configurations, and I would not hesitate to recommend them for your consideration.

FSF says 4 layers best and most common, others go with 3 layers. (We are male, 5'9", 162 lbs, back and side sleeper, stiff hips, lower back, and female 5'4", 120 lbs., side mostly, not that picky)


Foam Sweet Foam mentions on their site that their four-layer combination is their most popular, but whether or not it is the “best” would be your own personal choice, and there certainly would be no reason to avoid a three-layer system for your BMIs if you so desired (SleepEZ also has a four-layer option).

When you can't test a mattress in person, then the most reliable source of guidance is always a more detailed phone conversation with a knowledgeable and experienced retailer or manufacturer that has your best interests at heart and who can help "talk you through" the specifics of their mattresses and the properties and "feel" of the materials they are using and the options they have available that may be the best "match" for you based on the information you provide them, any local testing you have done or mattresses you have slept on and liked or other mattresses you are considering that they are familiar with, and the "averages" of other customers that are similar to you. They will know more about "matching" their specific mattress designs and firmness levels to different body types, sleeping positions, and preferences (or to other mattresses that they are familiar with) than anyone else.

As a side and back sleeper, they’ll be sure to suggest something with enough of a “comfort cradle” on top when sleeping upon your side, but also a combination that provides enough seep support to help you maintain a more neutral alignment when on both your back and side. This can be accomplished via both three and four-layer systems. If you are having hip and low back issues, this can commonly be caused by sinking in too deeply, which could be a result of the support of your current mattress being inadequate or the comfort materials losing their resiliency or being inadequate as well, or a combination of both.

All have tradeability, which is good.


Yes. You’ll have more options for configurability with the SleepEZ or the Foam Sweet Foam, as you can rearrange and change out the multiple layers, versus the top layer with the PlushBeds.

FSF warranty is longest.


Warranties in general are not nearly as important to me as knowing the materials because the reason most people need to replace a mattress is not a manufacturing defect but the loss of comfort and/or support which is not covered by a warranty. Knowing the materials in a mattress will tell you how long the original qualities of a mattress will last relative to other types of materials, and the items you are considering all use good quality and durable materials.

How to pull trigger?


After reading through the mattress shopping tutorial, I’d then place a phone call and speak with each manufacturer or retailer you’re considering and have a detailed conversation about what you’re expecting out of a new mattress and then receive the recommendation from each company. Then you can take some time and make a pro/con list and logically narrow down your choices.

Phoenix


Researching for a mattress?... Be sure to read this post first.

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