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Nest Latex Hybrid vs. Brooklyn Bloom Hybrid

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01 Mar 2020 10:16 #1 by Endymion
Hello,
I've been researching new mattresses for about a month (and getting mired in the countless details that I never dreamed existed around types of mattresses, construction, etc.). First, some background. I'm looking to replace my 12-year-old Sealy innerspring mattress in size twin xl. Apart from the general life expectancy clearly having been reached and surpassed, there is a slightly noticeable sag in the mid-section of the mattress. I am 6' 2", weigh 175 pounds, and am quite physically active. Recently, I've begun experiencing back pain in the thoracic and lumbar areas of my spine. Physical therapy has helped, but I imagine a new mattress will contribute greatly to pain alleviation.

Most of my considerations for a replacement mattress have been of the hybrid variety, and I've leaned more toward the latex hybrids after hearing that they sleep cooler than the memory foam hybrids. I tend to be a stomach sleeper (knowing full well that this least healthy of positions probably contributes to my back pain), but occasionally I veer into combo sleeping between stomach and back. To give a brief sense of the mattresses I have considered and eliminated, here is a pretty exhaustive list: the King Koil hybrid, the Leesa Hybrid, Helix Dusk (considered but not tried in person), the Purple mattress, Stearns and Foster, Serta, Sealy, Aireloom, Saatva hybrid, Winkbed (again, not in person), the Casper hybrid, Bear Hybrid (not in person), Dreamcloud, Avocado, My Green Mattress, Beautyrest, and Tuft & Needle (not in person). The two that seem best suited to my needs are the Nest Latex Hybrid, which I tried out in person, and Brooklyn Bedding's Bloom Hybrid.

Both mattresses have a similar design, though the Bloom uses talalay latex while the Nest uses dunlop. Nest also has 6-inch coils while the Bloom has 8-inch coils. I've been in contact with both companies, and they have been extremely helpful and never exert the high-pressure tactics of many showroom salespeople. However, I am having difficulty identifying which mattress design would be superior for my purposes (spine alignment, sleeps cool, feeling of sleep "on" the bed). Many sites say talalay sleeps cooler than dunlop but that dunlop is denser and more supportive (a plus in my case). I was able to confirm from each company some additional specs: the Bloom hybrid twin xl weigh 75 pounds and contains approximately 582 coils; the Nest hybrid twin xl weighs 95 pounds and contains 420 coils. Is the coil count differential indicative of quality in this case? Likewise, is the additional weight in the Nest due to the supposedly heavier dunlop latex? I did mention to the salespeople that I have a mild latex allergy, but they assured me that the treatment process of the latex removes something along the lines of 99.9% of all allergens that trigger latex allergies in people.

Both companies have great reputations (Brooklyn Bedding having been around since 1995; Nest since 2011), with generous trial periods. However, as with most customers, I'd rather make the right choice out of the gate and not have to deal with the returns process. Lastly, there is a Nest showroom in my area -- do any of the above-mentioned factors tip the balance in favor of one or the other? I know the decision ultimately comes down to me, but at this point I could use the guidance of an expert or fellow mattress shoppers!

Many thanks.

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03 Mar 2020 16:52 #2 by Sensei
Hey Endymion,

Welcome to the TMU forum and thanks for you question.

I'm looking to replace my 12-year-old Sealy innerspring mattress in size twin xl. Apart from the general life expectancy clearly having been reached and surpassed, there is a slightly noticeable sag in the mid-section of the mattress. I am 6' 2", weigh 175 pounds, and am quite physically active. Recently, I've begun experiencing back pain in the thoracic and lumbar areas of my spine. Physical therapy has helped, but I imagine a new mattress will contribute greatly to pain alleviation.


Congrats on your new mattress shopping journey :cheer: ! Agreed, 12 years of use is quite awhile for a mattress and often is the point where normal wear of components can lead to physical symptoms for the user. Hopefully your symptoms are temporary due to your current sleep environment and PT will help alleviate them while your mattress research is underway.

Most of my considerations for a replacement mattress have been of the hybrid variety, and I've leaned more toward the latex hybrids after hearing that they sleep cooler than the memory foam hybrids. I tend to be a stomach sleeper (knowing full well that this least healthy of positions probably contributes to my back pain), but occasionally I veer into combo sleeping between stomach and back. To give a brief sense of the mattresses I have considered and eliminated, here is a pretty exhaustive list: the King Koil hybrid, the Leesa Hybrid, Helix Dusk (considered but not tried in person), the Purple mattress, Stearns and Foster, Serta, Sealy, Aireloom, Saatva hybrid, Winkbed (again, not in person), the Casper hybrid, Bear Hybrid (not in person), Dreamcloud, Avocado, My Green Mattress, Beautyrest, and Tuft & Needle (not in person). The two that seem best suited to my needs are the Nest Latex Hybrid, which I tried out in person, and Brooklyn Bedding's Bloom Hybrid.


Fantastic work, Endymion! Good to hear that you have some local resources for site visits and mattress testing comparisons. It sounds as though you have done a good job researching your options and have identified those most closely suited to your personal preferences/ PPP. While I haven't shared this link in awhile, for other consumers who may be following your post, Phoenix's Mattress Shopping Tutorial ,a comprehensive guide for making the best quality/ value choice in mattresses is a useful resource for those beginning their search.

I've been in contact with both companies, and they have been extremely helpful and never exert the high-pressure tactics of many showroom salespeople. However, I am having difficulty identifying which mattress design would be superior for my purposes (spine alignment, sleeps cool, feeling of sleep "on" the bed). Many sites say talalay sleeps cooler than dunlop but that dunlop is denser and more supportive (a plus in my case).


Both talalay and dunlop are types of latex foams. Talalay has a springy, "uplifting" feel while dunlop's feel is, as you said, "firmer" and more supportive. Latex is also the most breathable of all foams, an important part of temperature regulation for those who tend to sleep hot. Because even in the softer versions of latex, it has a higher resilience and is more "supportive" than other foams and also helps support the more recessed areas of your body, such as the lumbar, that need "filling in" and are not in close contact with the firmer support layers underneath.

I was able to confirm from each company some additional specs: the Bloom hybrid twin xl weigh 75 pounds and contains approximately 582 coils; the Nest hybrid twin xl weighs 95 pounds and contains 420 coils. Is the coil count differential indicative of quality in this case? Likewise, is the additional weight in the Nest due to the supposedly heavier dunlop latex?


I did a little investigating online on specs for both the Nest Latex Hybrid and BB Bloom Hybrid. According to Nest Bedding's site, the Nest Latex Hybrid has a 3" dunlop comfort layer over 6" pocketed coils, with a 1" 1.5lb foam layer above and below the coils. While the coil count wasn't specified, the twin XL mattress weight is listed at 65 lbs (for comparison, the queen size is listed at 100 lbs), doubtful that the 95 lb number you have is accurate. The BB site lists its Bloom Hybrid as having 3" of talalay, 8" pocketed coils with a 1" high-density foam base, weighing in at the 75 lbs you cited above. Their weights are quite close if the website comparisons are accurate.

Both companies have great reputations (Brooklyn Bedding having been around since 1995; Nest since 2011), with generous trial periods. However, as with most customers, I'd rather make the right choice out of the gate and not have to deal with the returns process. Lastly, there is a Nest showroom in my area -- do any of the above-mentioned factors tip the balance in favor of one or the other?


Agreed, both have generous "risk-free" sleep trials, allowing you to have the option to make a comfort exchange should your initial layering not be quite as you expected. And both companies offer quality components and support, @Nest Bedding being a trusted member could offer a bit of a discount to you as a TMU consumer subscriber, should that be the way you decide to go. Ultimately, the choice of what is best for you will be for you to decide…

I am moving your post to the General Forum, where other consumer subscribers and trusted members can offer their thoughts. Keep us posted on your research when you have time and looking forward to hearing about your decision.

Cheers,
Sensei

Sensei(@ TMU Team)
Researching for a mattress?... Be sure to read The Mattress Shopping Tutorial.
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04 Mar 2020 00:24 #3 by Endymion
Thank you, Sensei, for the comprehensive response to my query! I am enormously appreciative of the advice and research you contributed to the various issues I raised, not to mention for moving this post to the General Forum (for the life of me, I could not figure out how to post there).

The corrected weight for the Nest Latex Hybrid comes as a great relief. I thought 95-lbs sounded too heavy for a twin xl (and this weight was quoted to me through direct correspondence with the manager of my local Nest store; there's also an Avocado store a mere four blocks away! but their three-zone design placed too much pressure on my mid-section). 65-lbs and 75-lbs (for the Bloom) sound much more manageable. I only live on the second floor of my building, but lugging a mattress close to 100-lbs was not an inducement to purchase it!

The old Sealy mattress is headed straight for the dump as soon as a new mattress gets decided upon and delivered. I think that I managed to squeeze extra life out of it over the years because of how much I travel and spend time on other beds. You mentioned that both talalay and dunlop are supportive, but could you expand a little more on what you mean by "uplifting" in the case of the talalay? Also, could you comment on the general construction of the Nest Latex Hybrid in contrast to the Brooklyn Bloom Hybrid? Does the spring length (6" versus 8") matter in terms of quality, longevity, or support? Insofar as the components are concerned and how they are layered, do you detect any "weaknesses"? (a term I have seen other members on here use, and which I believe Phoenix delves into more in one of the purchasing guides.) Lastly, I took a mattress sensor test at one of these large showroom chain stores -- no idea how accurate their "results" are -- and it indicated that my height/weight/sleep preference would do best on a medium-firm mattress. Does talalay and/or dunlop retain its resilience and bounce over time, or is one going to soften to a noticeable degree as the mattress "settles"?

Much indebted for insights,

Endymion

P.S. Yes, any additional discount from Nest because of their trusted member status would be welcome! They've been an incredibly courteous company to work with, as has Brooklyn Bedding.

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04 Mar 2020 22:49 #4 by Endymion
Also, based on the specs of the two latex hybrid mattresses, is it possible to determine if one would offer better edge support? Or is this something that cannot be definitively discovered except in person?

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06 Mar 2020 09:02 #5 by Kdot
Hi! I thought I would chime in as I recently returned a Bloom Hybrid, in Plush. I have no experience with the Nest. To answer this question, there is absolutely no edge support on the Bloom. I am 105lbs and regularly in the 30 day trial felt as though I was going to slide off during the night. Also, wanted to mention the 30 day trial sucked. I wish I hadn’t given away my old mattress, because it was a very painful 30 days. The customer service was not helpful after purchase until I posted a negative review. The plush is very soft and the bed is incredibly bouncy. We had previously had an all latex mattress and that is what we went with after the return. I know everyone ones needs are different. My partner is 6’2” 180lbs, side and back sleeper and found the Bloom caused considerable back pain for him as well. His was lower back, mine was upper back. Also, if you share the bed, it was not pleasant as every movement transferred as well as his weight created a deep valley for me to fall into. The mattress is incredibly heavy and thick. I’m sure the medium would have been more comfortable as we prefer a firmer mattress, but I was not willing to risk getting stuck with it after the return. I also looked into the Luma, and wish I had tried their hybrid, as the comfort layer is easily changeable and there was no 30 day requirement. Sorry to be so negative, but it was not a pleasant sleep experience for me.

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07 Mar 2020 15:05 #6 by Endymion
Hi, Kdot! Thank you for chiming in. All perspectives are helpful when sorting through the deluge of mattress choices. Given how much faith one has to put in a mattress-in-the-box company without the tactile component (though so many sites claim 10-20 minutes of trying a mattress out is hardly foolproof), your negative experience is probably far from unusual. It's a shame the customer service experience was so unhelpful. This kind of feedback about returns was partly what turned me off to Saatva (hardly any critical reviews to be found on their website; those on third-party sites indicated hassles with returns, among other things). The weight of the mattress is also a consideration that is worth noting, and the motion transfer sounds less than ideal. Your partner and I are fairly close in height and weight, and the back issues that sprung up from the plush model are very relevant to my own situation. To speak of my experience with Nest (who has a showroom in my city), they have the changeable comfort layer like Luma, but there is a 30-day wait period before a return can be initiated, just like Brooklyn. I don't think I'd heard of Luma before, but I will be sure to look into their latex hybrid model as a serious contender in my search!

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08 Mar 2020 03:57 #7 by happycat8
I am in the middle of a similar search for a mattress and I found a mattress very similar to Nest for less than half the price from Yankee Mattress factory:

custommattressmakers.com/collections/mattresses

It's Cocoa-Firm. The construction is almost identical to Nest. Like Nest they use LP Quantum Edge Elite coils (Bolsa instead of Combi), so the edge support should not be a problem. What seems to distinguish Nest and Yankee from other hybrid latex mattresses is quilted cover with 1.5'' quilting foam. You can read Nest talking about this in Comment #30 here . Quantum Edge Elite coils are also in Avocado, but the cover is more firm. I watched Sleepopolis reviews on Youtube of Avocado, Bloom and Nest, and the side sleeping pressure points seem to be less pronounced on Nest and Bloom, so I decided to order Yankee Cocoa-Firm.

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08 Mar 2020 12:39 #8 by Sensei
Hey Endymion,

Thank you, Sensei, for the comprehensive response to my query! I am enormously appreciative of the advice and research you contributed to the various issues I raised, not to mention for moving this post to the General Forum (for the life of me, I could not figure out how to post there).


Thanks for the kind words and happy to hear you found the information helpful :) .

You mentioned that both talalay and dunlop are supportive, but could you expand a little more on what you mean by "uplifting" in the case of the talalay?


This is a good question, Endymion, and one that receives some lively debate with regard to individual "feel" in personal preferences/ ppp. Latex foam is generally made using one of two different manufacturing methods, the first known as Dunlop process, producing a denser form of latex and the second known as Talalay, resulting in a softer, more "lively" feel. Phoenix provides detailed insights in the TMU article Latex- pros and cons , an explanation of not only the differences in the raw materials of foams but also in the manufacturing process itself. To quote Phoenix directly: "The feel of the two latex production methods is also different with the denser Dunlop feeling less lively or "springy", blended Talalay being more springy, and natural rubber/ NR Talalay being the most elastic and lively yet. The difference is a matter of preference in feel rather than a difference of "better or worse."

could you comment on the general construction of the Nest Latex Hybrid in contrast to the Brooklyn Bloom Hybrid? Does the spring length (6" versus 8") matter in terms of quality, longevity, or support?


The Bloom Hybrid uses Quantum coils in 8" that is 16 gauge along the perimeter (with a different geometry) and 13 gauge in the center, numbers cited in previous post, Quality Bed in a Box or "S" brand . While I don't find similar/ comparable information here for Nest Latex Hybrid, both manufacturers use high quality, durable pocket coils in the mattress construction, the difference in a 6" versus 8" coil would not be a "quality" concern here but more of a support preference.

Insofar as the components are concerned and how they are layered, do you detect any "weaknesses"? (a term I have seen other members on here use, and which I believe Phoenix delves into more in one of the purchasing guides.)


The Phoenix article you mention, Five steps to your perfect mattress- Durability , does reference "weakest links/ weaknesses" as those lesser quality mattress materials often found in the comfort layers, which could break down more quickly in response to wear and use. Both the Nest Latex Hybrid and BB Bloom Hybrid use 3" of latex foam in the comfort layer, the highest quality foam in terms of comfort and durability, over a pocket coil support layer, nothing here to suggest a "weakness" in terms of durability.

Thanks to consumer subscribers @Kdot and @happycat8 for sharing your experiences and research with the TMU forum . Hearing both the "good" and "bad" details is helpful when seeking more information, providing it goes with the caveat of knowing that only You can feel what You feel in terms of personal comfort preferences/ PPP of a mattress. Thanks for keeping us updated Endymion and looking forward to hearing how things go ;) .

Sensei

Sensei(@ TMU Team)
Researching for a mattress?... Be sure to read The Mattress Shopping Tutorial.
Click here for TMU Discount Codes if purchasing from Our Trusted Members.
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12 Mar 2020 08:41 #9 by amaheshw
Hey Endymion,

Not sure if this factors into your analysis, but Nest and BB are made in the same factory. If you are ever in Phoenix, drive by BB's factory and you will see both companies names on the factory (also visible via Google Maps). However, their product lines are not identical. It seems Nest uses coils made by Leggett & Platt, whereas BB uses Ascension (not sure if this is BB proprietary design or made by someone else).

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13 Mar 2020 12:49 #10 by Sensei
Hey amaheshw,

Welcome back to the TMU forum :) .

Not sure if this factors into your analysis, but Nest and BB are made in the same factory. If you are ever in Phoenix, drive by BB's factory and you will see both companies names on the factory (also visible via Google Maps). However, their product lines are not identical. It seems Nest uses coils made by Leggett & Platt, whereas BB uses Ascension (not sure if this is BB proprietary design or made by someone else).


Nest Bedding is one of our  TMU Trusted Members and like all the members here, I think very highly of and consider them to be among the "best of the best" in the industry.
 
While Nest Bedding is a  partner of Brooklyn Bedding , they are separate entities functioning independently under separate leadership. BB’s factory operations contract manufacturer for Nest Bedding. This partnership does not raise any conflicts as it relates to Nest’s membership in TMU. Brooklyn Bedding manufactures beds with different specifications and designs for different customers. As to why one is a member and the other not...BB was a member for several years with BB’s membership in TMU ending late last year…FYI.

Thanks,
Sensei

Sensei(@ TMU Team)
Researching for a mattress?... Be sure to read The Mattress Shopping Tutorial.
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