mattressunderground logo
× Welcome to the Expert advice section of the forum. Any mattress questions are welcome.... but make sure you've read the Mattress Shopping tutorial linked in the top right of the page:)

normal Adjustable Base with Latex Mattress

More
12 Jan 2018 20:10 #1 by craz4cakes

Hi. I need to have my bed adjustable for health reasons and I'm wondering if a Latex mattress is able to work well with an adjustable base. If yes, which is better to use, Dunlop or Talalay, and why? Which would work better, latex or memory foam? Thanks so much!

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
13 Jan 2018 09:31 #2 by MattressToGo

Hey craz4cakes,

Latex and memory foam mattresses in general will work well with a power foundation, but it's important to note exactly what you mean by a "latex mattress" and a "memory foam mattress", or more specifically, what someone who is selling you one of these mattresses means by it.

Latex is generally the most durable of the foam materials, and technically a latex mattress should contain all latex layers. But there are some mattresses called "latex" by sales people that use polyurethane foam support cores or innerspring units that are still called "latex". Those with a polyurethane foam core should work well on an adjustable bed base, and those using some sort of a pocketed spring unit, especially those with steel perimeter edge systems, should also work well. Of course, an all-latex mattress will work well (it's what I recommend for adjustable bed use to my customers), and the choice of Dunlop or Talalay would be a personal preference, not a durability issue.

Typical memory foam mattresses will use a polyurethane foam support core, and these generally work quite well with power foundations. Others use a pocketed spring unit (sometimes referred to as "hybrids"), and those also can work well on power foundations.

When in doubt, always check with your retailer to make sure that whatever item you're considering is "adjustable bed friendly", and doesn't use a metal border rod, inflexible foam perimeter, or an innerspring unit that is not made to bend.

Jeff Scheuer, The Beducator
Beducation/ Mattress To Go


Jeff Scheuer, The Beducator™ Owner of Mattress To Go
Researching for a mattress?... read The Mattress Shopping Tutorial.
Click here for TMU Discount Codes if purchasing from Trusted Members

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
14 Jan 2018 12:07 - 14 Jan 2018 15:40 #3 by craz4cakes

Thank you Jeff. I truly appreciate your insight! By latex, I mean 100% all natural latex, and by memory foam, I mean polyurethane. I tried this mattress today at a furniture store just to get a feel of a natural latex mattress:
Retreat by Bob's Discount Furniture (they are the only ones in our local area that carry anything close to 100% latex)
Quilt:
- Luxurious stretch knit cover
- Natural cashmere anti- microbial safeguard fiber
- 1" super soft comfort layer
- 1/2" plush comfort layers

Pillowtop:
- 3x 1" Layers of plush Talalay Latex

Mattress:
- 1" Layer of support foam
- 8" Soy based foam support core

The salesperson did not have access to the ILD of the latex or the density of the foam layers. He said he is going to try to secure those numbers from the corporate office tomorrow, but he's not certain they will release them to him. I really liked the feel of this mattress but will not purchase until I know exactly what I'm buying and certain that it's high quality.

Also, I am not familiar with Soy foam. Can you give some insight? Is it durable, does density matter and does density relate to the softness or firmness of the mattress, are ILD's a measurement of soy foam like latex, and will this feel different than a 100% latex mattress?

I also noticed that in the zero gravity position, the comfort cover, but not the mattress material, bunched up and created a kind of bulge which, in my mind, could be problematic in the future. Is there a way to eliminate this bunching, such as using a different material that might be more stretchy or fitting, different quilting, etc.? Thank you!!

Last Edit: 14 Jan 2018 15:40 by craz4cakes.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
15 Jan 2018 08:42 #4 by MattressToGo

craz4cakes,

I don't know that what you tested will give you a great idea of what an all-latex mattress feels, like, as it doesn't have very much latex in it. There's polyurethane foam in the quilt (1.5") and then there's only 3" of Talalay latex, then 9" of polyurethane foam beneath this. Polyurethane foam will fee and respond differently from latex, so I wouldn't take too much out of your testing, and instead search out something using all-latex or expand your search to a larger region.

As for bunching up, you're testing an item with 1.5" of polyurethane foam and some fiber in the quilt panel, and as a mattress effectively "shortens" when you're adjusting the head and foot up, there will necessarily be some "bunching" of the upper quilt layer (as it "floats"). As this mattress has 1.5" of foam quilted in the "floating" quilt panel (as opposed to a stretch-knit cover quilted to no foam, or something similarly used in an all-latex mattress) you'll notice this more in what you tested.

I wouldn't be concerned with the density of the polyurethane foam unless you were considering purchasing this specific item, as it is a reflection upon the durability of that foam (not the comfort). And the ILD of the latex won't tell you more than the actual testing that you did, as it's much easier to determine the softness of foam layers through actual testing versus ILD numbers on a piece of paper. So in essence, what I'm saying is that the testing you did unfortunately won't yield too much as far as being a good reference to an all-latex mattress, and knowing the specs you mentioned aren't necessary unless you want to purchase that specific mattress.

Regarding soy, this is just a reference that some of the polyols used to make polyurethane foam using soy material as a precursor versus petroleum sources. You can search SOY or BIOH on the forum - it's been discussed here previously in quite a bit of detail. Frankly, most polyurethane foam produced domestically is using some percentage of soy-based polyol, and some stores "hype" the use of it as somehow being superior to other foams, which isn't necessarily the case. It's quite ubiquitous.

Jeff Scheuer, The Beducator
Beducation / Mattress To Go


Jeff Scheuer, The Beducator™ Owner of Mattress To Go
Researching for a mattress?... read The Mattress Shopping Tutorial.
Click here for TMU Discount Codes if purchasing from Trusted Members

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
15 Jan 2018 11:26 - 15 Jan 2018 12:08 #5 by craz4cakes

Ok, I will definitely try something else. The salesperson told me it was all latex. I assumed I could trust him... That means we will have to drive into Chicago, but it's worth it to get a high quality bed that I need to help me. We are considering the Costco Sleep Science 9" Natural Latex Mattress. It has a 3" Talalay 19 ILD topper and 6" Talalay 32 ILD core with a medium feel. Do you think this mattress will have a similar feel to the previous one from Bob's Discount Furniture? Does your store carry something comparable?

As far as the bunching up issue with the cover, should I look for a stretch-knit cover with a layer of wool? What kind of cover material do you recommend that is stretch-knit? Is something like the Costco 9" latex mattress a better cover option to minimize the bunching issue? It is made of organic cotton and a layer of wool. I must sleep with my head elevated every night and I want to avoid a lower back problem because of the extra material. Thank you again!

Attachments:
Last Edit: 15 Jan 2018 12:08 by craz4cakes. Reason: Added info

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
15 Jan 2018 11:46 - 15 Jan 2018 11:47 #6 by MattressToGo

craz4cakes,

They may have told you it was all latex, but the specifications you provided obviously tell an entirely different story. That's why it's so important to learn what is inside of any mattress you're considering.

As for cover material, some people prefer the feel of wool and its use for the FR barrier within a mattress. It's all quite personal. Quilting to wool can make the cover a little thicker and stiffer, but that also would depend upon the fabric to which it is quilted and the thickness of the wool used. Thicker "canvas-style" covers like from Savvy Rest are quilted to wool and a bit stiffer when new, but they break in and are generally quite unobtrusive as time goes on. Most stretch knit covers will be percentages of cotton, polyester, spandex, elastin, viscose and so on. How they flex and feel would be something you'd want to test personally. Even these will have to "bunch up" a bit by necessity, but generally not anything that can be felt. And remember that even with the covers quilted to wool, you'll be on the mattress when it adjusts and the "bunching" generally isn't an issue.

Jeff Scheuer, The Beducator
Beducation / Mattress To Go


Jeff Scheuer, The Beducator™ Owner of Mattress To Go
Researching for a mattress?... read The Mattress Shopping Tutorial.
Click here for TMU Discount Codes if purchasing from Trusted Members
Last Edit: 15 Jan 2018 11:47 by MattressToGo.

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
15 Jan 2018 12:48 #7 by craz4cakes

Once again, thank you, thank you, thank you!

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.

More
15 Jan 2018 13:29 #8 by MattressToGo

;)


Jeff Scheuer, The Beducator™ Owner of Mattress To Go
Researching for a mattress?... read The Mattress Shopping Tutorial.
Click here for TMU Discount Codes if purchasing from Trusted Members

Please Log in or Create an account to join the conversation.